Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Terracotta; 13 3/8 x 11 3/8 x 8 1/8 in. (34 x 29 x 20.5 cm). Museo di Roma, Palazzo Braschi, Rome, Italy.

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Graphite on paper; 3 1/8 x 4 in. (80 x 100 mm). Museo Civico, Bassano del Grappa, Italy.

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Plaster; 31 1/2 x 18 1/8 x 26 3/4 in. (80 x 46 x 68 cm). Gypsotheca e Museo Antonio Canova, Possagno, Italy.

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Plaster; 20 1/8 x 9 x 17 3/4 in. (51 x 23 x 45 cm). Gypsotheca e Museo Antonio Canova, Possagno, Italy.

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Plaster; 31 1/2 x 18 1/8 x 25 5/8 in. (80 x 46 x 65 cm). Gypsotheca e Museo Antonio Canova, Possagno, Italy.

by Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Plaster; 66 1/2 x 39 3/8 x 54 3/4 in. (169 x 100 x 139 cm). Gypsotheca e Museo Antonio Canova, Possagno, Italy.

after Antonio Canova (1757—1822)

Plaster; 2' 8-11/16" x 4' 7-1/2" (83.1 cm x 141.0 cm). North Carolina Museum of History, Raleigh, NC.

During the war ... Washington thought his way to federalism, long before a Federalist Party existed. He believed in a strong central government, supreme over the states; a strong financial system on the British model, with taxes to fund its debt; a flourishing commerce to create prosperity (and to train seamen for a powerful navy, which would in turn protect shipping); and a strong military. And most officers came out of the experience of the Revolution with the same views.

Myron Magnet
The Founders at Home: The Building of America, 1735 - 1817 (2014)