Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; 127.5 x 107 cm. National Trust, Knole, Kent, England.

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; Height: 244 cm (96.1 in). Width: 152.4 cm (60 in). Kenwood House, English Heritage; London, England.

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas, feigned oval; 29 7/8 in. x 24 7/8 in. (760 mm x 631 mm). National Portrait Gallery, London, England.

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; 238.8 × 158.7 cm (94 × 62.5 in). Royal Collection Trust, Buckingham Palace, London, England.

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; 71 × 40 cm (28 × 15.7 in). Private collection ???

Admiral Lord George Brydges Rodney (1719—92)

by Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; 29 1/2 in. x 24 1/2 in. (749 mm x 622 mm). National Portrait Gallery, London, England.

by John Henry Robinson (1796—1871), after Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Stipple and line engraving; paper size with decorative border: 11 1/8 in. x 7 5/8 in.

by George Kirtland (fl.1791—98), after Thomas Gainsborough (1727—88)

Oil on canvas; 142 x 119 cm. City of London Corporation, Guildhall Art Gallery, London, England.

By the mid 1770s, Champlain’s Quebec had grown into a huge province stretching to the Mississippi River and including modern-day Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. It was home to eighty thousand inhabitants, though only 2 percent of them spoke English. Despite its official status as a North American colony under British rule, Quebec never became a part of the coalition of colonies that eventually declared their independence in 1776. Language and religious differences set the Québécois well apart from their neighbors to the south, and when representatives of the lower thirteen colonies met at the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1774, no delegate from Quebec answered the roll.

Thomas A. Desjardin
Through a Howling Wilderness: Benedict Arnold’s March to Quebec, 1775 (2006)