William Will (1742—98)

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter, wood; length (including handle): 45 inches (114.3 cm); diameter: 12 inches (30.5 cm). Philadelp

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter; 6 1/8 x 4 1/2 in. (15.6 x 11.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter with engraved decoration; 4 3/4 x 4 1/2 inches (12.1 x 11.4 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art,

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter; H. 8 1/8 in. (20.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY.

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter; 7 5/8 x 6 3/4 x 4 3/4 in. (19.4 x 17.1 x 12.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter, peawood; 5 1/4 x 8 3/8 x 4 1/2 in. (13.3 x 21.3 x 11.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

by William Will (1742—98)

Pewter, wood; without handle: 6 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches (16.5 x 17.2 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art, Ph

The disarrayed condition of the colonies in 1764 — economies and societies in flux with changes wrought by war, governments trying simultaneously to adjust to international peace and cope with the effects of Indian insurrections — helps explain how the colonists reacted to British efforts to reform imperial relations.… But the single most significant factor was the depression that by 1764 had fastened a clammy grip on trade in every colony, and which would not fully release it until the decade had ended.

Fred Anderson
Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 - 1766 (2000)