Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

 

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Plaster, painted to resemble terra cotta; cast about 1788; 27 3/4 x 19 1/8 x 12 in. (70.485 x 48.5775 x 30.48 cm).

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

 

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Cast when Marquis de Lafayette was 28.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Based on the life mask cast by Houdon in 1785.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Marble. State Artwork Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Terra cotta patinated plaster. Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Monticello, Charlottesville, VA.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Plaster. The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, NY.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Based on the life mask cast by Houdon when he visited Mount Vernon in 1785.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Based on the life mask cast by Houdon when he visited Mount Vernon in 1785.

Madison’s enemies came up with a strong opponent [for the House of Representatives in 1789] — his investment partner, James Monroe. Seven years younger than Madison, Monroe was tall, handsome, earnest, vigorous. He had crossed the Delaware with Washington and survived a bullet in his lungs at the Battle of Trenton; after leaving the army he had read law with Jefferson. Jefferson loved Madison, but he loved is other protégé, too. At one point he dreamed of both men moving next to him at Monticello. With such neighbors, he wrote Madison, I could ... lay myself up for the residue of life, quitting all contentions.

Richard Brookhiser
James Madison (2011)