Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

Terracotta; H. 29 1/2 in. (75 cm). Musée des Beaux-Arts, Nantes, Italy.

attrib. Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

Marble; 23 7/8 x 20 inches. Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, SC.

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

With base: 28 7/8 x 22 x 13 in. (73.3 x 55.9 x 33 cm), H. (without base) approx. 24 1/2 in.

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

Off-white painted terra cotta; 9 1/2 x 27 1/2 x 21 1/2 in., 80 lb.

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

Painted plaster; 9 3/4 x 26 x 19 1/4 in., 30 lb. (24.8 x 66 x 48.9 cm, 13.6 kg). New-York Historical Society, New York, NY.

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

U.S. Supreme Court, Washington, DC.

by Giuseppe Ceracchi (1751—1801)

White marble; 9 1/4 x 19 1/2 x 13 in., 87 lb. (23.5 x 49.5 x 33 cm, 39.5 kg). New-York Historical Society, New York, NY.

In a land where horsemanship was often men’s touchiest point of pride, Jefferson had to admit he never saw Washington’s like for grace and control in the saddle. A froniter runner and Indian wrestler — his friend George Mercer described his frame as padded with well-developed muscles — Washington had by 1774 refined mere energy down to a grace of least movement, the higher athleticism of the dance. And he danced well.

Garry Wills
Inventing America: Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence (1978)