Mather Brown (1761—1831)

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; 30 1/4 x 25 1/4 (76.80 x 64.14). American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA.

The artist at age 50.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; 91.4 x 71.1 x (36 x 28 1/16 in).

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA.

Known as Nabby (1765—1813), daughter of John and Abigail Adams.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; 34 ½ x 27 ¼ in. (90.2 x 71.3 cm). Boston Athenæum, Boston, MA.

after Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Portrait by unknown artist after a 1785 painting by Brown.

attrib. Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; H. 30 in. (76.2 cm), W. 25 in. (63.5 cm). Private collection.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; 249.9 x 181.6 cm. Royal Collection Trust, London, England.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas; 8 3/16 x 64 3/8 in. (249.4 x 163.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY.

by Mather Brown (1761—1831)

Oil on canvas. New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT.

I set out on this ground, which I suppose to be self-evident, that the earth belongs in usufruct to the living; that the dead have neither powers nor rights over it. This, with its echo of the Declaration (self-evident) was Jefferson at his most terse. Except for the phrase in usufruct — a legalism meaning the right to use property for a certain time — Jefferson’s words could be chiseled in stone, or shouted on the hustings.

Richard Brookhiser
James Madison (2011)