Edward Savage (1761—1817)

by Edward Savage (1761—1817)

Oil on canvas. Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA.

by Edward Savage (1761—1817)

Oil on canvas. Adams National Historical Park, Quincy, MA.

by Edward Savage (1761—1817)

Oil on canvas; 76.1 x 63.3 cm (29 15/16 x 24 15/16 in). National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

by Edward Savage (1761—1817)

Oil on canvas; 213.6 x 284.2 cm (84 1/8 x 111 7/8 in). The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

by Robert Edge Pine (1730—88)

Oil on canvas. Historical Society of Pennsylvania Collection, Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent, Philadelphia, PA.

by Edward Savage (1761—1817)

Stipple engraving printed on hand laid paper; 47.9 x 65.5cm (18 7/8 x 25 13/16"). National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian), Washington, DC.

The British red coat (which gave the British soldiers the soubriquet of lobsterback) had been instituted in 1660 and was not to leave the battlefield until 1882. It was the national corporate logo, and arrayed beneath it were subordinate brands — the regiments with their facing colors (the contrast color of the lapel and cuff), connected to the mother brand but differentiated.

Michael Stephenson
Patriot Battles: How the War of Independence Was Fought (2007)