Generals

British & Germans

Continental Army, Militia & French

  • William Alexander, Lord StirlingContinental Army general — one of Washington’s best
  • Benedict ArnoldTalented Continental Army general who defected to the British
  • Horatio GatesContinental Army general, won the Battles of Saratoga
  • Henry KnoxContinental Army general, chief artillery officer, first Secretary of War
  • Tadeusz KosciuszkoPolish patriot, fought seven years in the American Revolution
  • Marquis de LafayetteFrench aristocrat, Continental Army officer, like a son to Washington
  • Charles LeeContinental Army general, formerly a British officer
  • Richard MontgomeryIrish-born Continental Army general, formerly a British officer
  • Daniel MorganMilitia soldier, military tactician, Continental Army general
  • Israel PutnamMilitia general, fought with distinction at the British at Bunker Hill
  • comte de RochambeauCommander-in-chief of French forces
  • Philip SchuylerContinental Army general, U.S. Senator for NY
  • Arthur St. ClairContinental Army general, surrendered Fort Ticonderoga to the British
  • Baron von SteubenContinental Army general from Prussia, drilled the troops at Valley Forge
  • John SullivanContinental Army general, Continental Congress delegate, NH governor
  • George WashingtonCommander-in-chief of the Continental Army; first President
  • Anthony WayneContinental Army general, defeated the British at Stony Point

Greene, Nathanael

  • Nathanael GreeneContinental Army general; key to winning the war in the South

The First Congress faced a unique challenge, and those congressmen and senators who gathered in New York in the spring of 1789 were awed by what lay ahead of them. Not only would members of the Congress have to pass some promised amendments to the new Constitution, but they would have to fill out the bare framework of a government that the Philadelphia Convention had created, including the organization of the executive and judicial departments. Some therefore saw the First Congress as something in the nature of a second constitutional convention.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)