Battles

battles  |  campaigns  |  maps

Battle Sort descending Location End Date
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 17-Jan-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Lexington / Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Feb-1776
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 29-Aug-1778
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781

Yet there is no doubt that his natural abilities were what most distinguished [John] Marshal from other lawyers and jurists. His head, said Senator Rufus King, is the best organized of anyone I have known. Marshal could grasp a subject in its whole and yet simultaneously analyze it parts and relate them to the whole. He could move progressively and efficiently from premise to conclusion in a logical and rigorous manner and extract the essence of the law from the mass of particulars. In the words of Justice Story, he had the remarkable ability to seize, as it were by intuition, the very spirit of juridical doctrines. Even Jefferson acknowledged Marshall’s talent, but he scarcely respected it. Jefferson told Story that when conversing with Marshall, I never admit anything. So sure as you admit any position to be good, no matter how remote from the conclusion he seeks to establish, you are gone. So great is his sophistry you must never give him an affirmative answer, or you will be forced to grant his conclusion. Why, if he were to ask me whether it were daylight or not, I’d reply, Sir, I don’t know, I can’t tell.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)