Battles

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Battle Sort descending Location End Date
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Virginia — Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 07-Nov-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Lexington and Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Oct-1776
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 08-Feb-1778
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781

Since the heady moment when he married Martha Custis in 1759, combining their estates into one of the preeminent holdings in northern Virginia, everything Washington touched had turned to brass. He had failed repeatedly to grow profitable tobacco crops. In London his leaf had acquired an unshakable reputation for mediocrity. Meanwhile the expenses of maintaining a great planter’s lifestyle, while keeping up a slave labor force and several plantations, had proved unrelenting. His own debtors — former comrades-in-arms who unhesitatingly touched him for loans, neighbors with whom he ran accounts, tenants who owed him rent — were slow to pay, and sometimes never did; yet he was too tightly bound by the expectations of gentlemanly behavior to refuse a loan when asked, or to press a debtor insistently when payment fell due. By 1763 Washington found himself deep in debt, doubting that he would ever extricate himself by growing tobacco, and casting about to find some way out of his predicament.

Fred Anderson
Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 - 1766 (2000)