Battles

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Battle Sort descending Location End Date
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Virginia — Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 07-Nov-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Lexington and Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Oct-1776
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 08-Feb-1778
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781

The First Congress faced a unique challenge, and those congressmen and senators who gathered in New York in the spring of 1789 were awed by what lay ahead of them. Not only would members of the Congress have to pass some promised amendments to the new Constitution, but they would have to fill out the bare framework of a government that the Philadelphia Convention had created, including the organization of the executive and judicial departments. Some therefore saw the First Congress as something in the nature of a second constitutional convention.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)