Battles

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Battle Location Sort descending End Date
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Lexington and Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Oct-1776
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 08-Feb-1778
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 07-Nov-1781
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Virginia — Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781

As students of Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau are always reminding us, the age of reason was really an age of sentiment. In this too, Washington was a man of his age. When he established the first general decoration in the American Army, the Purple Heart, it was not (as it became in the twentieth century) an award available to all soldiers wounded in the line of duty. Only privates and noncomissioned officers could win the original Badge of Military Merit, a cloth-shaped heart sewn over the man’s actual heart, which allowed him to pass all guards and sentinels which officers are permitted to do. The symbol was not of heart’s blood shed, but of virtue proceeding from the heart. Limiting the award to nonofficers was meant to indicate that great virtue can be shown regardless of rank — that in Washington’s words, the road to glory in a patriot army and a free country is thus open to all.

Garry Wills
Cincinnatus: George Washington & the Enlightenment (1984)