Battles

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Battle Location End Date Sort ascending
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 29-Aug-1788
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 07-Nov-1781
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Virginia — Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Oct-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Lexington and Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775

America had a common language, unlike the European nations, none of which was linguistically homogeneous. in 1789 the majority of Frenchmen did not speak French but were divided by a variety of provincial patois. Englishmen from Yorkshire were incomprehensible to those from Cornwall and vice versa. By contrast, Americans could understand one another from Maine to Georgia. It was very obvious why this should be so, said John Witherspoon, president of Princeton. Since Americans were much more unsettled, and move frequently from place to place, they are not as liable to local peculiarities, either in accent or phraseology.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)