Battles

battles  |  campaigns  |  maps

Battle Location End Date Sort ascending
Siege of Yorktown Virginia 19-Oct-1781
Battle of Eutaw Springs South Carolina 08-Sep-1781
Battle of Groton Heights Connecticut 06-Sep-1781
Battle of Chesapeake Capes Chesapeake Bay 05-Sep-1781
Battle of Guilford Courthouse North Carolina 15-Mar-1781
Battle of Cowpens South Carolina 17-Jan-1781
Battle of Kings Mountain South Carolina 07-Oct-1780
Battle of Camden South Carolina 16-Aug-1780
Battle of Waxhaws South Carolina 29-May-1780
Siege of Charleston South Carolina 12-May-1780
Siege of Savannah Georgia 20-Oct-1779
Battle of Stony Point New York 15-Jul-1779
Battle of Savannah Georgia 29-Dec-1778
Battle of Rhode Island Rhode Island 29-Aug-1778
Battle of Monmouth New Jersey 28-Jun-1778
Siege of Mud Island Fort (Fort Mifflin) Pennsylvania 15-Nov-1777
Battle of Red Bank (Fort Mercer) New Jersey 22-Oct-1777
Battles of Saratoga New York 07-Oct-1777
Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton New York 06-Oct-1777
Battle of Germantown Pennsylvania 04-Oct-1777
Battle of Brandywine Pennsylvania 11-Sep-1777
Battle of Bennington New York 16-Aug-1777
Battle of Oriskany New York 06-Aug-1777
Siege of Fort Ticonderoga New York 06-Jul-1777
Battle of Princeton New Jersey 03-Jan-1777
Battle of Trenton New Jersey 26-Dec-1776
Battle of Fort Washington New York 16-Nov-1776
Battle of White Plains New York 28-Oct-1776
Battle of Valcour Island New York 11-Oct-1776
Battle of Harlem Heights New York 16-Sep-1776
Battle of Long Island New York 27-Aug-1776
Fortification of Dorchester Heights Massachusetts 04-Mar-1776
Battle of Moore’s Creek Bridge North Carolina 27-Feb-1776
Battle of Quebec Quebec, Canada 31-Dec-1775
Battle of Bunker Hill Massachusetts 17-Jun-1775
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga New York 10-May-1775
Battle of Lexington / Concord Massachusetts 19-Apr-1775

Washington’s courage thrilled his men. But he was not an enlisted man’s general. He did not interact personally with them, and would not let his officers do so either. Officers under his command who supped or slept in enlisted men’s headquarters were routinely punished. To Washington’s mind, discipline and hierarchy were central to maintaining unit cohesion and integrity. No warm, outgoing person, notes one historian, Washington bound men to him by his own sense of justice and dedication. Yet how his troops viewed him, and in what ways their opinions may have changed over time, is uncertain. Although nineteenth-century history books and old soldiers’ memoirs resonate with references to the commander-in-chief’s inspirational presence, diaries and other accounts written in wartime rarely mention him.

Edward G. Lengel
General George Washington: A Military Life (2005)