Battle Maps

battles  |  campaigns  |  maps

Map Battle End Date Sort descending

Battle of Lexington and Concord

19-Apr-1775

Battle of Bunker Hill

17-Jun-1775

Battle of Quebec

31-Dec-1775

Fortification of Dorchester Heights

04-Mar-1776

Battle of Long Island

27-Aug-1776

Battle of Harlem Heights

16-Sep-1776

Battle of Valcour Island

11-Oct-1776

Battle of Trenton

26-Dec-1776

Battle of Princeton

03-Jan-1777

Siege of Fort Ticonderoga

06-Jul-1777

Battle of Brandywine

11-Sep-1777

Battle of Germantown

04-Oct-1777

Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton

06-Oct-1777

Battles of Saratoga

07-Oct-1777

Battle of Rhode Island

08-Feb-1778

Battle of Monmouth

28-Jun-1778

Battle of Stony Point

15-Jul-1779

Siege of Charleston

12-May-1780

Battle of Camden

16-Aug-1780

Battle of Guilford Courthouse

15-Mar-1781

Battle of Chesapeake Capes

05-Sep-1781

Battle of Eutaw Springs

08-Sep-1781

Siege of Yorktown

19-Oct-1781
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Battle of Cowpens

07-Nov-1781

For all their artistic and philosophical brilliance, the Greeks were failures at politics; Hamilton, in the Federalist, expressed horror and disgust at the distractions with which they were agitated. The Romans captured the American imagination because they had done what the Americans themselves hoped to do — sustain an extensive republic over a course of centuries. So the society of Revolutionary War officers called themselves Cincinnati; president, congress, and senate were all Roman terms. But the Roman example was also cautionary, for when they lost their virture, they slid into empire. When Franklin said, in response to a question from Eliza Powel, that the constitutional convention had produced a republic, if you can keep it, he and she would have remembered that the Romans had failed to keep theirs.

Richard Brookhiser
Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington (1996)