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Vermont
Place City
Bennington Battle Monument Bennington An obelisk marks the site where military supplies were stored and commemorates the battle that took place two miles away in New York.
Bennington Museum Bennington Memorializes the Battle of Bennington (1777); includes local and military artifacts and the “Bennington Flag.”
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Hubbardton The visitor center has a museum that includes artifacts and a diorama of the battle.
Mount Independence State Historic Site Orwell Remnants of a fort and the most important Revolutionary War site in Vermont. Originally connected to Fort Ticonderoga by a floating bridge.
Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Vergennes Dedicated to preserving the maritime history of Lake Champlain, it includes a replica of a gunboat used by Benedict Arnold.
Old Constitution House Windsor Delegates from the independent state of Vermont met here to write a constitution, making it a republic.

Washington’s courage thrilled his men. But he was not an enlisted man’s general. He did not interact personally with them, and would not let his officers do so either. Officers under his command who supped or slept in enlisted men’s headquarters were routinely punished. To Washington’s mind, discipline and hierarchy were central to maintaining unit cohesion and integrity. No warm, outgoing person, notes one historian, Washington bound men to him by his own sense of justice and dedication. Yet how his troops viewed him, and in what ways their opinions may have changed over time, is uncertain. Although nineteenth-century history books and old soldiers’ memoirs resonate with references to the commander-in-chief’s inspirational presence, diaries and other accounts written in wartime rarely mention him.

Edward G. Lengel
General George Washington: A Military Life (2005)