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South Carolina
Place City
Kings Mountain National Military Park Blacksburg This 3,945 acre park commemorates the 1780 battle between colonialists — Patriot vs. Loyalist with no British involved.
Historic Camden Revolutionary War Site Camden The 107-acre site includes the town of 18th century Camden, the Joseph Kershaw mansion — headquarters for Lord Cornwallis — and more. Fourteen battles of the Revolution were fought in the area.
Drayton Hall Charleston The mansion, built 1738-42, was the birthplace of patriot William Henry Drayton.
Middleton Place Charleston Well-preserved eighteenth century plantation with America's oldest landscaped gardens; the house dates to the late 1730s.
Old Slave Mart Museum Charleston Opened in 2007, the museum offers a narrative history of slavery in the U.S. The building, formerly Ryan’s Mart, was an actual showroom where slaves were bought and sold.
Cowpens National Battlefield Chesnee A pasturing area at the time of the battle, the site covers 845 acres and is preserved to its 1781 appearance.
Charles Pinckney National Historic Site Mount Pleasant Charles Pinckney was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a governor; the 28-acre site is just a remnant of Pinckney's 715-acre coastal plantation, Snee Farm.
Ninety Six National Historic Site Nintey Six Commemorates two Revolutionary War battles and includes the original 1781 Star Fort, historic roads, the original town sites of Ninety Six & Cambridge, the reconstructed Stockade Fort, and siege trenches.

Madison’s enemies came up with a strong opponent [for the House of Representatives in 1789] — his investment partner, James Monroe. Seven years younger than Madison, Monroe was tall, handsome, earnest, vigorous. He had crossed the Delaware with Washington and survived a bullet in his lungs at the Battle of Trenton; after leaving the army he had read law with Jefferson. Jefferson loved Madison, but he loved is other protégé, too. At one point he dreamed of both men moving next to him at Monticello. With such neighbors, he wrote Madison, I could ... lay myself up for the residue of life, quitting all contentions.

Richard Brookhiser
James Madison (2011)