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Rhode Island
Place City
General Nathanael Greene Homestead Coventry Built in 1770, home to the General that George Washington recommended as his replacement if he should be die.
Varnum House Museum East Greenwich Mansion built in 1773 by James Mitchell Varnum, who became one of Washinton's generals and later elected to the Continental Congress.
Colony House Newport Completed in 1739, it was the state house of Rhode Island until 1901.
Hunter House Newport Built 1748—54 and considered one of the ten best colonial homes existing in the U.S.
Redwood Library and Athenaeum Newport Chartered in 1747 and opened to the public in 1750, it is the oldest circulating library in the U.S.
Touro Synagogue Newport Completed and dedicated in 1763, it is the oldest Synagogue in the U.S.; following the war it served as a meeting place for the Rhode Island General Assembly, Rhode Island Supreme Court and the town of Newport.
Trinity Church Newport Completed in 1726, it has a pipe organ tested by Georg Friedrich Handel; French Admiral Charles de Ternay is buried in the adjacent cemetery.
White Horse Tavern Newport Now a restaurant, originally built in 1673 as a residence, and for awhile, the meeting place of the general assembly.
Fort Butts Portsmouth The earthwork redoubt is still discernable, it was a key position during the Battle of Rhode Island (1778), and provides a panoramic view of Mt. Hope Bay.
Benefit Street’s Mile of History Providence A street of restored colonial homes and buildings overlooking the waterfront.
Old State House Providence Built in 1762, the State House was the primary seat of state government until 1901.
Gilbert Stuart Birthplace & Museum Saunderstown This restored house, built in 1750, was the birthplace of painter Gilbert Stuart.

Yet there is no doubt that his natural abilities were what most distinguished [John] Marshal from other lawyers and jurists. His head, said Senator Rufus King, is the best organized of anyone I have known. Marshal could grasp a subject in its whole and yet simultaneously analyze it parts and relate them to the whole. He could move progressively and efficiently from premise to conclusion in a logical and rigorous manner and extract the essence of the law from the mass of particulars. In the words of Justice Story, he had the remarkable ability to seize, as it were by intuition, the very spirit of juridical doctrines. Even Jefferson acknowledged Marshall’s talent, but he scarcely respected it. Jefferson told Story that when conversing with Marshall, I never admit anything. So sure as you admit any position to be good, no matter how remote from the conclusion he seeks to establish, you are gone. So great is his sophistry you must never give him an affirmative answer, or you will be forced to grant his conclusion. Why, if he were to ask me whether it were daylight or not, I’d reply, Sir, I don’t know, I can’t tell.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)