CT | DC | DE | GA | MA | MD | ME | NC | NH | NJ | NY | PA | RI | SC | TN | VA | VT
Rhode Island
Place City
General Nathanael Greene Homestead Coventry Built in 1770, home to the General that George Washington recommended as his replacement if he should be die.
Varnum House Museum East Greenwich Mansion built in 1773 by James Mitchell Varnum, who became one of Washinton's generals and later elected to the Continental Congress.
Colony House Newport Completed in 1739, it was the state house of Rhode Island until 1901.
Hunter House Newport Built 1748—54 and considered one of the ten best colonial homes existing in the U.S.
Redwood Library and Athenaeum Newport Chartered in 1747 and opened to the public in 1750, it is the oldest circulating library in the U.S.
Touro Synagogue Newport Completed and dedicated in 1763, it is the oldest Synagogue in the U.S.; following the war it served as a meeting place for the Rhode Island General Assembly, Rhode Island Supreme Court and the town of Newport.
Trinity Church Newport Completed in 1726, it has a pipe organ tested by Georg Friedrich Handel; French Admiral Charles de Ternay is buried in the adjacent cemetery.
White Horse Tavern Newport Now a restaurant, originally built in 1673 as a residence, and for awhile, the meeting place of the general assembly.
Fort Butts Portsmouth The earthwork redoubt is still discernable, it was a key position during the Battle of Rhode Island (1778), and provides a panoramic view of Mt. Hope Bay.
Benefit Street’s Mile of History Providence A street of restored colonial homes and buildings overlooking the waterfront.
Old State House Providence Built in 1762, the State House was the primary seat of state government until 1901.
Gilbert Stuart Birthplace & Museum Saunderstown This restored house, built in 1750, was the birthplace of painter Gilbert Stuart.

More than any other figure who strode across the revolutionary stage, [Joseph] Warren gave his devotion to the American cause simply because he believed in it. Others believed as passionately, of course; but for Samuel Adams political agitation was a profession which had rescued him from a debtors’ prison; James Otis had deep grievances against the royal government because of their mistreatment of his father; John Hancock was a millionaire merchant who made much of his money from smuggling and owed the British Revenue Service over £100,000 in fines; as a lawyer, John Adams was naturally drawn into the political arena. Warren, as a doctor could have remained aloof, as many of his fellow physicians in Boston did. They were the only class in Massachusetts who were not pressured to join the cause.

Thomas Fleming
Now We Are Enemies: The Story of Bunker Hill (1960; reissued 2010)