Hamilton Grange National Memorial

New York
NY

Hamilton Grange in upper Manhattan

QUICK FACTS
  • Hamilton only lived in the home for two summers; he was fatally wounded by Aaron Burr in a dual 11-Jul-1804.
  • This is the third location for the house. It was moved in 1889 (by four blocks) and then again to its present location (2 blocks) in 2008.
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Completed in 1802, Alexander Hamilton commissioned this Federal style country home on 32-acres in upper Manhattan for use during the summer by his family. He was deeply involved with the architect, John McComb, Jr., to ensure the design met his specifications. Hamilton named it The Grange after his family’s ancestral home in Scotland.

Moved to a new location in 2008, the house sits on a portion of St. Nicholas Park in upper Manhattan, which was part of the original estate. It re-opened 17 September 2011 after $14.5 million in renovations by the National Park Service.

Associated People

What ultimately convinced Americans that they must revolt in 1776 was not that they were naturally and inevitably republican, for if that were truly the case evolution, not revolution, would have been the eventual solution. Rather it was the pervasive fear that they were not predestined to be a virtuous and egalitarian people that in the last analysis drove them into revolution in 1776. It was this fear and not their confidence in the peculiarity of their character that made them so readily and so remarkably responsive to Thomas Paine’s warning that the time for independence was at hand and that delay would be disastrous. By 1776 it had become increasingly evident that if they were to remain the kind of people they wanted to be they must become free of Britain.

Gordon S. Wood
The Creation of the American Republic, 1776—1787 (1969)