Hamilton Grange National Memorial

New York
NY

Hamilton Grange in upper Manhattan

QUICK FACTS
  • Hamilton only lived in the home for two summers; he was fatally wounded by Aaron Burr in a dual 11-Jul-1804.
  • This is the third location for the house. It was moved in 1889 (by four blocks) and then again to its present location (2 blocks) in 2008.
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Completed in 1802, Alexander Hamilton commissioned this Federal style country home on 32-acres in upper Manhattan for use during the summer by his family. He was deeply involved with the architect, John McComb, Jr., to ensure the design met his specifications. Hamilton named it The Grange after his family’s ancestral home in Scotland.

Moved to a new location in 2008, the house sits on a portion of St. Nicholas Park in upper Manhattan, which was part of the original estate. It re-opened 17 September 2011 after $14.5 million in renovations by the National Park Service.

Associated People

The Farm Book, plus the elaborate chronologies made by Jefferson scholars which document almost every day of his life, demonstrate that contrary to what Martha [Jefferson] Randolph told her sons, Jefferson was not only not distant from Sally Hemings but in the same house nine months before the births of each of her seven children, and that she conceived no children when he was not there.

Fawn M. Brodie
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974)