Hamilton Grange National Memorial

New York
NY

Hamilton Grange in upper Manhattan

QUICK FACTS
  • Hamilton only lived in the home for two summers; he was fatally wounded by Aaron Burr in a dual 11-Jul-1804.
  • This is the third location for the house. It was moved in 1889 (by four blocks) and then again to its present location (2 blocks) in 2008.
LINKS
LOCATION

View Larger Map

Completed in 1802, Alexander Hamilton commissioned this Federal style country home on 32-acres in upper Manhattan for use during the summer by his family. He was deeply involved with the architect, John McComb, Jr., to ensure the design met his specifications. Hamilton named it The Grange after his family’s ancestral home in Scotland.

Moved to a new location in 2008, the house sits on a portion of St. Nicholas Park in upper Manhattan, which was part of the original estate. It re-opened 17 September 2011 after $14.5 million in renovations by the National Park Service.

Associated People

[Lord Frederick] North defended his role in the war for America to his death. He insisted that it did not originate in a despotic wish to tyrannise America, but from the desire of maintaining constitutional authority of Parliament over the colonies. He admitted that the war with American had been unfortunate but not unjust, adding that if he had been forced to mount the scaffold in consequence of the part that I have performed in its prosecution, I shall continue to maintain that it was founded in right and dictated by necessity.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)