Hamilton Grange National Memorial

New York
NY

Hamilton Grange in upper Manhattan

QUICK FACTS
  • Hamilton only lived in the home for two summers; he was fatally wounded by Aaron Burr in a dual 11-Jul-1804.
  • This is the third location for the house. It was moved in 1889 (by four blocks) and then again to its present location (2 blocks) in 2008.
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Completed in 1802, Alexander Hamilton commissioned this Federal style country home on 32-acres in upper Manhattan for use during the summer by his family. He was deeply involved with the architect, John McComb, Jr., to ensure the design met his specifications. Hamilton named it The Grange after his family’s ancestral home in Scotland.

Moved to a new location in 2008, the house sits on a portion of St. Nicholas Park in upper Manhattan, which was part of the original estate. It re-opened 17 September 2011 after $14.5 million in renovations by the National Park Service.

Associated People

As students of Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau are always reminding us, the age of reason was really an age of sentiment. In this too, Washington was a man of his age. When he established the first general decoration in the American Army, the Purple Heart, it was not (as it became in the twentieth century) an award available to all soldiers wounded in the line of duty. Only privates and noncomissioned officers could win the original Badge of Military Merit, a cloth-shaped heart sewn over the man’s actual heart, which allowed him to pass all guards and sentinels which officers are permitted to do. The symbol was not of heart’s blood shed, but of virtue proceeding from the heart. Limiting the award to nonofficers was meant to indicate that great virtue can be shown regardless of rank — that in Washington’s words, the road to glory in a patriot army and a free country is thus open to all.

Garry Wills
Cincinnatus: George Washington & the Enlightenment (1984)