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New Hampshire
Place City
American Independence Museum Exeter The museum focuses on the Revolution, colonial life, the Ladd, Gilman, and Folsom families.
Fort Constitution New Castle Originally named Fort William and Mary, colonists captured it 14 December 1774 in one of the first overt acts against England.
Fort Stark Historic Site New Castle Overlooking the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, Fort Stark was named in honor of General John Stark, commander of New Hampshire forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777).
Governor John Langdon House New Castle Built in 1783 for Major John Langdon — merchant, shipbuilder, representative to Continental Congress, and Governor of New Hampshire.
Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Portsmouth Georgian Mansion built 1760-63 by merchant John Moffatt; General William Whipple lived there during the war with his wife Katherine Moffatt Whipple.
Strawbery Banke Museum Portsmouth Living history museum dedicated to recreating colonial and early American life.
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion Portsmouth Built 1720—60, home of New Hampshire's first royal governor, Benning Wentworth.

The French years provided Franklin’s detractors precisely what they needed: proof that the ur-American was un-American. Franklin was the Founding Father who had come the furthest, which makes him today the most compelling; he was also the Founding Father who traveled the farthest, which in his own century made him the most suspect. Few other homes in Philadelphia sported both Réaumur and Fahrenheit thermometers. The story goes that when Franklin proposed that Congress open its meetings with a prayer, Alexander Hamilton quipped that that body had no need of foreign aid. The story may be apocryphal but the sentiment was real. The expatriate patriot, Franklin was associated in many minds with the dependent chapter of American independence, one better expunged from the record.

Stacy Schiff
A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America (2005)