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New Hampshire
Place City
American Independence Museum Exeter The museum focuses on the Revolution, colonial life, the Ladd, Gilman, and Folsom families.
Fort Constitution New Castle Originally named Fort William and Mary, colonists captured it 14 December 1774 in one of the first overt acts against England.
Fort Stark Historic Site New Castle Overlooking the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, Fort Stark was named in honor of General John Stark, commander of New Hampshire forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777).
Governor John Langdon House New Castle Built in 1783 for Major John Langdon — merchant, shipbuilder, representative to Continental Congress, and Governor of New Hampshire.
Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Portsmouth Georgian Mansion built 1760-63 by merchant John Moffatt; General William Whipple lived there during the war with his wife Katherine Moffatt Whipple.
Strawbery Banke Museum Portsmouth Living history museum dedicated to recreating colonial and early American life.
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion Portsmouth Built 1720—60, home of New Hampshire's first royal governor, Benning Wentworth.

Jefferson biographers express astonishment that the apprenticeship with Wythe lasted five full years, 1762 - 67, at a time when almost no one studied law for more than two. Patrick Henry studied not more than six weeks, or so at least he told Jefferson, and Wythe for one was so convinced of the inadequacy of Henry’s training he refused to sign his license. Jefferson’s years under Wythe, years of virtually uninterrupted reading, not only in the law but also in ancient classics, English literature, and general political philosophy, were not so much an apprenticeship for law as an apprenticeship for greatness.

Fawn M. Brodie
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974)