CT | DC | DE | GA | MA | MD | ME | NC | NH | NJ | NY | PA | RI | SC | TN | VA | VT
New Hampshire
Place City
American Independence Museum Exeter The museum focuses on the Revolution, colonial life, the Ladd, Gilman, and Folsom families.
Fort Constitution New Castle Originally named Fort William and Mary, colonists captured it 14 December 1774 in one of the first overt acts against England.
Fort Stark Historic Site New Castle Overlooking the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, Fort Stark was named in honor of General John Stark, commander of New Hampshire forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777).
Governor John Langdon House New Castle Built in 1783 for Major John Langdon — merchant, shipbuilder, representative to Continental Congress, and Governor of New Hampshire.
Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Portsmouth Georgian Mansion built 1760-63 by merchant John Moffatt; General William Whipple lived there during the war with his wife Katherine Moffatt Whipple.
Strawbery Banke Museum Portsmouth Living history museum dedicated to recreating colonial and early American life.
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion Portsmouth Built 1720—60, home of New Hampshire's first royal governor, Benning Wentworth.

In 1775 the British government was not the limited monarchy we know today. The King was in charge of the executive branch of the government and his duties and powers corresponded, roughly, to those the President now handles in the United States. ... Political parties as we understand them today had yet to be born. England was split into four or five factions, some revolving around a noble Lord such as Marquis of Rockingham, some around a class (the country squires) and roughly on-third of Parliament around the King who, through his executive power, had innumerable jobs, from cabinet post to lucrative sinecures, to dispense among those who supported him.

Thomas Fleming
Now We Are Enemies: The Story of Bunker Hill (1960; reissued 2010)