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New Hampshire
Place City
American Independence Museum Exeter The museum focuses on the Revolution, colonial life, the Ladd, Gilman, and Folsom families.
Fort Constitution New Castle Originally named Fort William and Mary, colonists captured it 14 December 1774 in one of the first overt acts against England.
Fort Stark Historic Site New Castle Overlooking the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, Fort Stark was named in honor of General John Stark, commander of New Hampshire forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777).
Governor John Langdon House New Castle Built in 1783 for Major John Langdon — merchant, shipbuilder, representative to Continental Congress, and Governor of New Hampshire.
Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Portsmouth Georgian Mansion built 1760-63 by merchant John Moffatt; General William Whipple lived there during the war with his wife Katherine Moffatt Whipple.
Strawbery Banke Museum Portsmouth Living history museum dedicated to recreating colonial and early American life.
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion Portsmouth Built 1720—60, home of New Hampshire's first royal governor, Benning Wentworth.

By modern standards there is something unlikeable about John Hancock. His type of patriotism and charity is as obsolete as his brocaded dressing-gowns and jewelled buttons. He was one of those men who curiously go in and out of style. Once they are out they are hard to value. ‘The golden showers of guineas’ that marked his almost royal progress, his big speeches, like ‘burn Boston and make John Hancock a beggar if the public good requires it,’ do not arouse in us the same genuine enthusiasm they did in his contemporaries. Such men as Paul Revere, [Royal Governor Thomas] Hutchinson, Joseph Warren, or Sam Adams never are in style or out. Their personalities exist quite independently from the accident of their birth in the first half of the eighteenth century. This is not quite true of John Hancock.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)