Historic Edenton

Edenton
NC

Portrait by Artist to Come

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Incorporated in 1722, Edenton is North Carolina's second oldest town. Historic Edenton, overlooking Albemarle Sound, features multiple sites for guided and self-guided tours.

Edenton

1. Barker House
Built in 1772, it was the home of Thomas and Penelope Barker. This lovely home overlooks Edenton Bay.
2. Chowan County Courthouse
Built in 1767 and in excellent condition, Chowan County Courthouse is one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the South.
3. Cupola House
Architecturally significant Jacobean-style house completed in 1758; purchased in 1768 by Samuel Dickenson, whose descendents lived there until 1918.
4. James Iredell House
Built in 1773 and purchased five years later by James Iredell, who became an associate justice of the first U.S. Supreme Court.
5. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
Completed in 1766, extensive repairs and the addition of a steeple were completed in 1809. Many of the Revolutionary leaders in this area were members of St Paul’s, including Joseph Hewes, Thomas Jones, and James Iredell.

Since the heady moment when he married Martha Custis in 1759, combining their estates into one of the preeminent holdings in northern Virginia, everything Washington touched had turned to brass. He had failed repeatedly to grow profitable tobacco crops. In London his leaf had acquired an unshakable reputation for mediocrity. Meanwhile the expenses of maintaining a great planter’s lifestyle, while keeping up a slave labor force and several plantations, had proved unrelenting. His own debtors — former comrades-in-arms who unhesitatingly touched him for loans, neighbors with whom he ran accounts, tenants who owed him rent — were slow to pay, and sometimes never did; yet he was too tightly bound by the expectations of gentlemanly behavior to refuse a loan when asked, or to press a debtor insistently when payment fell due. By 1763 Washington found himself deep in debt, doubting that he would ever extricate himself by growing tobacco, and casting about to find some way out of his predicament.

Fred Anderson
Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 - 1766 (2000)