Places to Visit

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North Carolina
Place City Sort descending
Alamance Battleground State Historic Site Burlington Fought in 1771, the Battle of Alamance was a precursor of the Revolution. The site includes a nature trail, monument, and a 1780 house that has been restored.
Moores Creek National Battlefield Currie This 86-acre park commemorates the 1776 victory of Patriots against Loyalists; includes a one-mile history trail.
Historic Edenton Edenton Incorporated in 1722, Edenton is North Carolina's second oldest town. Historic Edenton, overlooking Albemarle Sound, features multiple sites for guided and self-guided tours.
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park Greensboro The 220-acre park commemorates the 1781 battle between British and Americans, led by General Nathanael Greene; includes 28 monuments.
Tannenbaum Historic Park Greensboro Features exhibits depicting life before, during, and after the 1781 Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Halifax State Historic Site Halifax Founded in 1760, Historic Halifax is a restored village. In April 1776 representatives from the state gathered in Halifax to declare that North Carolina's delegates to the Continental Congress were empowered to declare independence from Britain. It was the first colony to do so.
Tryon Palace Historic Sites and Gardens New Bern This Georgian mansion was completed in 1770 as a residence for British Royal Governor William Tryon; it was also the meeting place for the colonial Assembly and the first capitol of North Carolina.
Burgwin-Wright Museum House Wilmington Built 1770 by John Burgwin, who was the colonial treasurer under the Royal Governor. General Lord Cornwallis rested here in 1781 prior to his march to Yorktown.

What ultimately convinced Americans that they must revolt in 1776 was not that they were naturally and inevitably republican, for if that were truly the case evolution, not revolution, would have been the eventual solution. Rather it was the pervasive fear that they were not predestined to be a virtuous and egalitarian people that in the last analysis drove them into revolution in 1776. It was this fear and not their confidence in the peculiarity of their character that made them so readily and so remarkably responsive to Thomas Paine’s warning that the time for independence was at hand and that delay would be disastrous. By 1776 it had become increasingly evident that if they were to remain the kind of people they wanted to be they must become free of Britain.

Gordon S. Wood
The Creation of the American Republic, 1776—1787 (1969)