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North Carolina
Place City
Alamance Battleground State Historic Site Burlington Fought in 1771, the Battle of Alamance was a precursor of the Revolution. The site includes a nature trail, monument, and a 1780 house that has been restored.
Moores Creek National Battlefield Currie This 86-acre park commemorates the 1776 victory of Patriots against Loyalists; includes a one-mile history trail.
Historic Edenton Edenton Incorporated in 1722, Edenton is North Carolina's second oldest town. Historic Edenton, overlooking Albemarle Sound, features multiple sites for guided and self-guided tours.
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park Greensboro The 220-acre park commemorates the 1781 battle between British and Americans, led by General Nathanael Greene; includes 28 monuments.
Tannenbaum Historic Park Greensboro Features exhibits depicting life before, during, and after the 1781 Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Halifax State Historic Site Halifax Founded in 1760, Historic Halifax is a restored village. In April 1776 representatives from the state gathered in Halifax to declare that North Carolina's delegates to the Continental Congress were empowered to declare independence from Britain. It was the first colony to do so.
Tryon Palace Historic Sites and Gardens New Bern This Georgian mansion was completed in 1770 as a residence for British Royal Governor William Tryon; it was also the meeting place for the colonial Assembly and the first capitol of North Carolina.
Burgwin-Wright Museum House Wilmington Built 1770 by John Burgwin, who was the colonial treasurer under the Royal Governor. General Lord Cornwallis rested here in 1781 prior to his march to Yorktown.

The French years provided Franklin’s detractors precisely what they needed: proof that the ur-American was un-American. Franklin was the Founding Father who had come the furthest, which makes him today the most compelling; he was also the Founding Father who traveled the farthest, which in his own century made him the most suspect. Few other homes in Philadelphia sported both Réaumur and Fahrenheit thermometers. The story goes that when Franklin proposed that Congress open its meetings with a prayer, Alexander Hamilton quipped that that body had no need of foreign aid. The story may be apocryphal but the sentiment was real. The expatriate patriot, Franklin was associated in many minds with the dependent chapter of American independence, one better expunged from the record.

Stacy Schiff
A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America (2005)