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North Carolina
Place City
Alamance Battleground State Historic Site Burlington Fought in 1771, the Battle of Alamance was a precursor of the Revolution. The site includes a nature trail, monument, and a 1780 house that has been restored.
Moores Creek National Battlefield Currie This 86-acre park commemorates the 1776 victory of Patriots against Loyalists; includes a one-mile history trail.
Historic Edenton Edenton Incorporated in 1722, Edenton is North Carolina's second oldest town. Historic Edenton, overlooking Albemarle Sound, features multiple sites for guided and self-guided tours.
Guilford Courthouse National Military Park Greensboro The 220-acre park commemorates the 1781 battle between British and Americans, led by General Nathanael Greene; includes 28 monuments.
Tannenbaum Historic Park Greensboro Features exhibits depicting life before, during, and after the 1781 Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Halifax State Historic Site Halifax Founded in 1760, Historic Halifax is a restored village. In April 1776 representatives from the state gathered in Halifax to declare that North Carolina's delegates to the Continental Congress were empowered to declare independence from Britain. It was the first colony to do so.
Tryon Palace Historic Sites and Gardens New Bern This Georgian mansion was completed in 1770 as a residence for British Royal Governor William Tryon; it was also the meeting place for the colonial Assembly and the first capitol of North Carolina.
Burgwin-Wright Museum House Wilmington Built 1770 by John Burgwin, who was the colonial treasurer under the Royal Governor. General Lord Cornwallis rested here in 1781 prior to his march to Yorktown.

Yet there is no doubt that his natural abilities were what most distinguished [John] Marshal from other lawyers and jurists. His head, said Senator Rufus King, is the best organized of anyone I have known. Marshal could grasp a subject in its whole and yet simultaneously analyze it parts and relate them to the whole. He could move progressively and efficiently from premise to conclusion in a logical and rigorous manner and extract the essence of the law from the mass of particulars. In the words of Justice Story, he had the remarkable ability to seize, as it were by intuition, the very spirit of juridical doctrines. Even Jefferson acknowledged Marshall’s talent, but he scarcely respected it. Jefferson told Story that when conversing with Marshall, I never admit anything. So sure as you admit any position to be good, no matter how remote from the conclusion he seeks to establish, you are gone. So great is his sophistry you must never give him an affirmative answer, or you will be forced to grant his conclusion. Why, if he were to ask me whether it were daylight or not, I’d reply, Sir, I don’t know, I can’t tell.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)