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Maryland
Place City
Charles Carroll House Annapolis Charles Carroll of Carrollton was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The house was begun in 1725 by his father and expanded several times through 1790.
Crypt of John Paul Jones Annapolis Completed in 1913, the remains of John Paul Jones are interred in a marble sarcophagus in a crypt located in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel.
Hammond-Harwood House Annapolis Brick house in the Georgian style begun in 1774; now a museum with period furnishings and fine arts.
Maryland State House Annapolis Built 1772—79, it served as the U.S Capitol 1783—84, and is the site where George Washington resigned his commission.
St. John’s College Annapolis Established in 1696 as King William’s School, it is the third oldest college in the U.S.; includes a monument to French troops who died in the war.
William Paca House and Garden Annapolis Built 1763—65 by William Paca, lawyer, patriot, and delegate to Continental Congress. The 37 room house has been restored to it's eighteenth century appearance.
Fort Frederick State Park Big Pool Completed in 1756 to protect the colonists during the French and Indian War. The Fort's stone wall and two barracks have been restored to their 1758 appearance.
Thomas Stone National Historic Site Port Tobacco Five-part mansion completed in 1773 called Haberdeventure. Thomas Stone was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Smallwood State Park Rison Named for General William Smallwood, fourth governor of Maryland. The 628-acre park includes Smallwood's retreat house, fully restored.

The unattractive truth was that the arrival of the provisional treaty ending the war in April 1783 made the Continental Army superfluous, and the sooner it disappeared, the better. Congress eventually voted to provide full pay for five years for officers in lieu of half pay for life, but doing so was a purely rhetorical exercise, since there was no money in the federal coffers to pay anyone. Even that meaningless commitment generated widespread criticism, especially in New England, where returning officers were greeted with newspaper editorials describing them as blood-beaked vultures feeding at the public trough. At least in retrospect, the dissolution of the Continental Army in the spring of 1783 was one of the most poignant scenes in American history, as the men who had stayed the course and won the war were ushered off without pay, with paper pensions and only grudging recognition of their service.

Joseph J. Ellis
The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783—1789 (2015)