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Maryland
Place City
Charles Carroll House Annapolis Charles Carroll of Carrollton was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The house was begun in 1725 by his father and expanded several times through 1790.
Crypt of John Paul Jones Annapolis Completed in 1913, the remains of John Paul Jones are interred in a marble sarcophagus in a crypt located in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel.
Hammond-Harwood House Annapolis Brick house in the Georgian style begun in 1774; now a museum with period furnishings and fine arts.
Maryland State House Annapolis Built 1772—79, it served as the U.S Capitol 1783—84, and is the site where George Washington resigned his commission.
St. John’s College Annapolis Established in 1696 as King William’s School, it is the third oldest college in the U.S.; includes a monument to French troops who died in the war.
William Paca House and Garden Annapolis Built 1763—65 by William Paca, lawyer, patriot, and delegate to Continental Congress. The 37 room house has been restored to it's eighteenth century appearance.
Fort Frederick State Park Big Pool Completed in 1756 to protect the colonists during the French and Indian War. The Fort's stone wall and two barracks have been restored to their 1758 appearance.
Thomas Stone National Historic Site Port Tobacco Five-part mansion completed in 1773 called Haberdeventure. Thomas Stone was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Smallwood State Park Rison Named for General William Smallwood, fourth governor of Maryland. The 628-acre park includes Smallwood's retreat house, fully restored.

There is a symmetry between the folly of Burgoyne’s march south to Saratoga and that of Cornwallis’s march north to Yorktown. Military historians debate why Burgoyne risked marching south from Fort Edward in the same way that they question why Cornwallis advanced north beyond North Carolina into Virginia. Although Cornwallis had none of the outward vanity of Burgoyne, the two men were similar in that they were both junior generals and neither of them was commander in chief of the British army in America. Both blamed their subsequent failures on rigid orders and insufficient latitude. They both expected to march through predominantly friendly territory. They both ignored the chain of command and went over the heads of their superiors to communicate independently with Lord George Germain. They both allowed their supply lines to become overextended and their forces suffered harassment by enemy militia. They presided over the two most decisive defeats of the American Revolutionary War.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)