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Maryland
Place City
Charles Carroll House Annapolis Charles Carroll of Carrollton was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The house was begun in 1725 by his father and expanded several times through 1790.
Crypt of John Paul Jones Annapolis Completed in 1913, the remains of John Paul Jones are interred in a marble sarcophagus in a crypt located in the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel.
Hammond-Harwood House Annapolis Brick house in the Georgian style begun in 1774; now a museum with period furnishings and fine arts.
Maryland State House Annapolis Built 1772—79, it served as the U.S Capitol 1783—84, and is the site where George Washington resigned his commission.
St. John’s College Annapolis Established in 1696 as King William’s School, it is the third oldest college in the U.S.; includes a monument to French troops who died in the war.
William Paca House and Garden Annapolis Built 1763—65 by William Paca, lawyer, patriot, and delegate to Continental Congress. The 37 room house has been restored to it's eighteenth century appearance.
Fort Frederick State Park Big Pool Completed in 1756 to protect the colonists during the French and Indian War. The Fort's stone wall and two barracks have been restored to their 1758 appearance.
Thomas Stone National Historic Site Port Tobacco Five-part mansion completed in 1773 called Haberdeventure. Thomas Stone was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Smallwood State Park Rison Named for General William Smallwood, fourth governor of Maryland. The 628-acre park includes Smallwood's retreat house, fully restored.

By 1789 many of the Federalists, particularly Hamilton, had no confidence whatsoever left in the virtue or the natural sociability of the American people as adhesive forces: to rely on such wild schemes and visionary principles, as radicals like Jefferson and Paine did, to tie the United States together, the Federalists said, was to rely on nothing. Hence Hamilton and the other Federalist leaders had to find things other than republican virtue and natural sociability to make the American people a single nation.

Tying people together, creating social cohesiveness, making a single nation out of disparate sections and communities without relying on idealistic republican adhesives — this was the preoccupation of the Federalists, and it explains much of what they did — from Washington’s proposals for building canals to Hamilton’s financial program.

Gordon S. Wood
The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States (2011)