Minute Man National Historical Park

Concord
MA

North Bridge in Concord

OTHER IMAGES

QUICK FACTS
  • Commemorates the 19 April 1775 Battle of Lexington / Concord, which started the Revolutionary War.
  • 88 militia were killed or wounded that day; 247 British Redcoats were killed or wounded.
  • There are reenactments of the battle on Patriot’s Day, which is an annual state holiday in Massachusetts.
  • Throughout the park are witness houses, whose occupants would have seen the British soldiers first-hand.
  • Not part of the park, but certainly a witness house, is the wonderfully preserved Old Manse near Concord Bridge.
  • It was colonial Major John Buttrick who first ordered his militia to fire on the British Regulars; the mansion that is now the North Bridge Visitor Center was built by descendants of the Buttrick family.
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LOCATION

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With over 900 acres, the Minute Man Historical Park traces the route originally taken by the British Regulars from Lexington to Concord. Starting at the Minute Man Visitor Center, a multimedia theater program provides an excellent introduction to the battle which began the American Revolution. Park Rangers are available for questions.

Battle Road Trail

The five-mile trail connects historic sites from Meriam’s Corner in Concord to the eastern boundary of the park in Lexington. It can be hiked or biked; or for the main sites, parking is available.

Hartwell Tavern

A significant community landmark in its day, Hartwell Tavern was also a prosperous farm and home to Ephraim and Elizabeth Hartwell and their children. The authentic structure is open for a self-guided tour.

North Bridge Visitor Center

Located in a brick mansion built in 1911, the North Bridge Visitor Center features a short video about the North Bridge fight, a bookstore, and exhibits. Includes a brass cannon, smuggled out of Boston in 1775, that was one of the four cannons hidden in Concord. The rebuilt North Bridge is a five-minute walk away.

In 1789 the South and especially Virginia had been the impelling force in creating the nation. By 1815 the South and slaveholders still seemed to be in control of the national government. President Madison was a slaveholder. So too were Speaker of the House, Henry Clay, James Monroe, the secretary of state, and George W. Campbell, the secretary of the treasury. All Republican leaders of the House were slaveholders. In 1815 the United States had four missions in Europe: two of them were held by slaveholders. The chief justice of the United States was a slaveholder, as were a majority of the other members of the Court. Since 1789 three of the four presidents, two of the five vice-presidents, fourteen of the twenty-six presidents pro tempore the Senate, and five of the ten Speakers of the House had been slaveholders.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)