Lexington Battle Green

Lexington
MA

The Minuteman on Lexington Battle Green

QUICK FACTS
  • Just above the Green is the Old Belfry (now replicated) whose bell summoned the militia that day.
  • Captain Parker and the other minutemen waited in nearby Buckman Tavern for the arrival of British troops.
  • The Minuteman Statue, sculpted by Massachusetts artist Henry Hudson Kitson, was erected in 1900.
  • Seven (of the eight) minutemen who died on the Common are buried beneath the Minuteman Statue.
  • There are reenactments of the Battle of Lexington / Concord on Patriot’s Day, which is an annual state holiday in Massachusetts. Lexington Battle Green serves as the main staging area.
LINKS
LOCATION

View Larger Map
Located across from the Lexington Visitors Center, Battle Green on 19 April 1775 was the Common at the center of Lexington. Neither the British Regulars nor the Lexington minutemen intended to fire the opening shot, but one was fired and a brief battle ensued. Eight colonial soldiers lost their lives; one Regular was wounded and later died. The War for Independence began. Today the triangular Battle Green includes the Minuteman Statue, representing Captain John Parker, who was the leader of the Lexington minutemen.

The Old Burying Ground

Located just a short walk to the north of Lexington Battle Green is the Old Burying Ground, with gravestones dating back to 1690. Captain John Parker is buried there as well as the wounded British soldier who died at Buckman Tavern three days after the event.
Associated People

Jefferson biographers express astonishment that the apprenticeship with Wythe lasted five full years, 1762 - 67, at a time when almost no one studied law for more than two. Patrick Henry studied not more than six weeks, or so at least he told Jefferson, and Wythe for one was so convinced of the inadequacy of Henry’s training he refused to sign his license. Jefferson’s years under Wythe, years of virtually uninterrupted reading, not only in the law but also in ancient classics, English literature, and general political philosophy, were not so much an apprenticeship for law as an apprenticeship for greatness.

Fawn M. Brodie
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974)