Old North Church

Boston
MA

Portrait by Artist to Come

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Called Christ Church in the 18th century; also known today as Christ Church in the City of Boston.

On if by land, two if by sea. On 18 April 1775 the church sexton, Robert Newman, using a code pre-arranged by Paul Revere, climbed the steeple and held two lanterns that signaled to colonists in Charleston that British Regulars were headed by sea to Concord to secure gunpowder and munitions that were stored there.

Used later by British General Thomas Gage during the Battle of Bunker Hill. Major John Pitcairn and other British soldiers are buried in vaults under the church.

Part of the Freedom Trail™.

Washington’s refusal to accept a salary for his services was emblematic of his somewhat ostentatious public virtue. He did open a public expense account, however, and some have claimed that he made money from it by overcharging Congress. In fact, the £150 per month that he requested for expenses was not just for him, but also for his entourage, which sometimes swelled to a crowd. His account books, which still exist, list charges for things like ferry fares, innkeepers’ fees, candlesticks, saddle repair, meat, fruit, mounds of cabbages and beets, and (admittedly) oceans of grog, liquor, and wine. Washington even charged Congress for fifteen shillings Cash paid a beggar by the General’s order. But although he was not averse to placing his headquarters in the occasional mansion, he otherwise made do with precious few luxuries.

Edward G. Lengel
General George Washington: A Military Life (2005)