Places to Visit

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Massachusetts
Place City Sort descending
Freedom Trail™ Boston A walking tour of 16 sites in central Boston , with a couple in Charlestown, almost all related to the Revolution, that can be completed in a day, or enjoyed more fully, in two to three days.
Dorchester Heights National Historic Site Boston The monument that stands in Dorchester Heights is dedicated to the victory of the Continental Army over the British Regulars in 1776.
Cambridge Common Cambridge The 16-acre Common is about a quarter of the original size; it was the main camp and training ground for the Continental Army and the location where Washington assumed command in 1775.
Longfellow National Historic Site Cambridge Built in 1759 by British Major John Vassal, the house on the grounds is formally called the Vassal-Craigie-Longfellow House. It served as the headquarters for Washington for nine months during the 1775-76 siege of Boston.
Concord Museum Concord The Museum displays Americana from the 17th through the 19th centuries; includes Revolutionary War powder horns, muskets, cannonballs, and fifes.
Minute Man National Historical Park Concord With over 900 acres, the Minute Man Historical Park traces the route originally taken by the British Regulars from Lexington to Concord; includes the Minute Man Visitor Center, North Bridge Visitor Center, Hartwell Tavern, and the five-mile Battle Road Trail.
Buckman Tavern Lexington In the early hours before the 1775 Battle of Lexington, 80 militia men waited at Buckman Tavern for the British Regulars. Built about 1709, the tavern now funcations as an historical museum.
Lexington Battle Green Lexington Located across from the Lexington Visitors Center, it is the site of the opening shots of the Revolution; includes a monument that stands atop and honors seven of the minutemen who were killed on the Battle Green (19-Apr-1775) after the “shot heard ‘round the world.”
Hancock-Clarke House Lexington Completed in 1737 by John Hancock's grandfather, the house is now a museum. On the night of Paul Revere's April 1775 ride John Hancock and Samuel Adams were awakened there with news of the advancing British troops.
Munroe Tavern Lexington Built in 1735, the tavern served as the British field hospital, and headquarters for Lord Hugh Percy, during the Battle of Lexington on 19-Apr-1775.
Royall House and Slave Quarters Medford Completed by Isaac Royall in 1739, the house is an expansion of an older brick house and is considered one of the finest 18th-century buildings in New England. The Slave Quarters is the only such structure in the norther U.S.
United First Parish Church Quincy The burial place of Presidents John Adams, his son, John Quincy Adams, and their wives — Abigail and Louisa Catherine.
Adams National Historical Park Quincy Commemorates the contributions of the Adams family to the new republic. Includes the birthplaces of John and John Quincy Adams as well as the family home, Peacefield.
Peabody Essex Museum Salem Contains one of the most important collections of Revolutionary War memoriabilia; includes ship models, relics, uniforms, and portraits.

But Adams did not just read books. He battled them. The casual presumption that there is some kind of rough correlation between the books in the library of any prominent historical figure and the person’s cast of mind would encounter catastrophe with Adams, because he tended to buy and read book with which he profoundly disagreed. Then, as he read, he recorded in the margins and at the bottom of the pages his usually hostile opinions of the arguments and authors.... [T]he Adams marginalia constitute evidence more revealing of his convictions about political theory than any of his official publications.

Joseph J. Ellis
Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams (1993)