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Massachusetts
Place City
Dorchester Heights National Historic Site Boston The monument that stands in Dorchester Heights is dedicated to the victory of the Continental Army over the British Regulars in 1776.
Freedom Trail™ Boston A walking tour of 16 sites in central Boston , with a couple in Charlestown, almost all related to the Revolution, that can be completed in a day, or enjoyed more fully, in two to three days.
Cambridge Common Cambridge The 16-acre Common is about a quarter of the original size; it was the main camp and training ground for the Continental Army and the location where Washington assumed command in 1775.
Longfellow National Historic Site Cambridge Built in 1759 by British Major John Vassal, the house on the grounds is formally called the Vassal-Craigie-Longfellow House. It served as the headquarters for Washington for nine months during the 1775-76 siege of Boston.
Concord Museum Concord The Museum displays Americana from the 17th through the 19th centuries; includes Revolutionary War powder horns, muskets, cannonballs, and fifes.
Minute Man National Historical Park Concord With over 900 acres, the Minute Man Historical Park traces the route originally taken by the British Regulars from Lexington to Concord; includes the Minute Man Visitor Center, North Bridge Visitor Center, Hartwell Tavern, and the five-mile Battle Road Trail.
Buckman Tavern Lexington In the early hours before the 1775 Battle of Lexington, 80 militia men waited at Buckman Tavern for the British Regulars. Built about 1709, the tavern now funcations as an historical museum.
Hancock-Clarke House Lexington Completed in 1737 by John Hancock's grandfather, the house is now a museum. On the night of Paul Revere's April 1775 ride John Hancock and Samuel Adams were awakened there with news of the advancing British troops.
Lexington Battle Green Lexington Located across from the Lexington Visitors Center, it is the site of the opening shots of the Revolution; includes a monument that stands atop and honors seven of the minutemen who were killed on the Battle Green (19-Apr-1775) after the “shot heard ‘round the world.”
Munroe Tavern Lexington Built in 1735, the tavern served as the British field hospital, and headquarters for Lord Hugh Percy, during the Battle of Lexington on 19-Apr-1775.
Royall House and Slave Quarters Medford Completed by Isaac Royall in 1739, the house is an expansion of an older brick house and is considered one of the finest 18th-century buildings in New England. The Slave Quarters is the only such structure in the norther U.S.
Adams National Historical Park Quincy Commemorates the contributions of the Adams family to the new republic. Includes the birthplaces of John and John Quincy Adams as well as the family home, Peacefield.
United First Parish Church Quincy The burial place of Presidents John Adams, his son, John Quincy Adams, and their wives — Abigail and Louisa Catherine.
Peabody Essex Museum Salem Contains one of the most important collections of Revolutionary War memorabilia; includes ship models, relics, uniforms, and portraits.

There is a symmetry between the folly of Burgoyne’s march south to Saratoga and that of Cornwallis’s march north to Yorktown. Military historians debate why Burgoyne risked marching south from Fort Edward in the same way that they question why Cornwallis advanced north beyond North Carolina into Virginia. Although Cornwallis had none of the outward vanity of Burgoyne, the two men were similar in that they were both junior generals and neither of them was commander in chief of the British army in America. Both blamed their subsequent failures on rigid orders and insufficient latitude. They both expected to march through predominantly friendly territory. They both ignored the chain of command and went over the heads of their superiors to communicate independently with Lord George Germain. They both allowed their supply lines to become overextended and their forces suffered harassment by enemy militia. They presided over the two most decisive defeats of the American Revolutionary War.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)