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District of Columbia
Place City
Daughters of the American Revolution Museum Washington Houses several hundred thousand books, historical documents, manuscripts, and genealogical material.
Lafayette Square Washington Dedicated to Lafayette in 1824; at each corner is a statue of one foreign generals who served in the war.
Library of Congress Washington Established in 1800, the collection includes a recreation of Jefferson’s library of 6,487 books, which he donated in 1815. Guided and self-guided tours available.
National Archives Washington Contains the original of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and more.
National Museum of American History Washington Houses a large collection of artifacts from the Revolution.
National Portrait Gallery Washington Contains historical portraits, including works by John Trumbull, Gilbert Stuart, John Singleton Copley, Mather Brown, and others.

Wounds [from battle] were first cleansed with lint, either dry or wet with oil, and bandaged lightly. Later they were to be washed with a digestive — a substance used to draw pus — and then covered with a bread-and-milk poultice, with oil for moisture. For the first twelve days, a cooling regiment of medicines and diet was recommended, on the theory that this lowered the danger of infection. The empiricists among the medical men of the time had noticed that a man ran a fever with an infection, and concluded, with somewhat superficial logic, that keeping him cool would lower the chances of the infection taking root.

Unfortunately, there was little or no interest in using clean bandages or instruments.

Thomas Fleming
Now We Are Enemies: The Story of Bunker Hill (1960; reissued 2010)