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Connecticut
Place City
Nathan Hale Homestead Coventry Built in 1776 and restored.
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park Groton The site of the Battle of Groton Heights (1781).
Yale University Art Gallery New Haven Home to one of the finest collections of early American art anywhere, it was founded in 1832 when John Trumbull gave more than one hundred of his portraits and historical paintings to Yale. Renovation and expansion completed in 2012.
Nathan Hale Schoolhouse New London The schoolhouse where Nathan Hale taught.
Shaw Mansion New London Built by Nathaniel Shaw; used by both Washington and Lafayette during the war.
General William Hart House Old Saybrook Built in 1767 and restored to its original condition, it is Old Saybrook Historical Society’s museum and headquarters.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum Wethersfield Three separate homes comprising a single museum, including the homes of Silas Deane, a member of the Continental Congress, and Joseph Webb; Washington and Rochambeau met there to lay out strategy.

By modern standards there is something unlikeable about John Hancock. His type of patriotism and charity is as obsolete as his brocaded dressing-gowns and jewelled buttons. He was one of those men who curiously go in and out of style. Once they are out they are hard to value. ‘The golden showers of guineas’ that marked his almost royal progress, his big speeches, like ‘burn Boston and make John Hancock a beggar if the public good requires it,’ do not arouse in us the same genuine enthusiasm they did in his contemporaries. Such men as Paul Revere, [Royal Governor Thomas] Hutchinson, Joseph Warren, or Sam Adams never are in style or out. Their personalities exist quite independently from the accident of their birth in the first half of the eighteenth century. This is not quite true of John Hancock.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)