Howe, William

PA — 11 September 1777.
Charlestown, MA — 17 June 1775.
New York, NY — 16 November 1776.
PA — 4 October 1777.
NY — 27 August 1776.
NY — 28 October 1776.
Charlestown, MA — With groundbreaking fifty years after the event of 17 June 1775, an obelisk commemorates the Battle of Bunker Hill and the fallen militia General Dr. Joseph Warren. A statue of Colonel William Prescott, one of the battle leaders, stands in front.
Philadelphia (Germantown), PA — Completed in 1772, British General Sir William Howe occupied the house after the Battle of Germantown in 1777; President Washington resided there in 1793 and 1794; includes period pieces and interactive exhibits.
Fort Washington, PA — Site of the temporary fort and encampment for the Continental Army in late 1777; offers picnicking, fishing, biking, and 3.5 miles of trails.
Boston, MA — 4 March 1776.

The most exciting scientific find of the period was Charles Willson Peale’s exhumation in 1801 near Newburgh, New York, of the bones of the mastodon, or mammoth. Peale displayed his mammoth in his celebrated museum and in 1806 painted a marvelous picture of what was perhaps the first organized exhumation in American history. Peale’s discovery electrified the country and put the word mammoth on everybody’s lips. A Philadelphia baker advertised the sale of mammoth bread. In Washington a mammoth eater ate forty-two eggs in ten minutes. And under the leadership of the Baptist preacher John Leland, the ladies of Cheshire, Massachusetts, late in 1801 sent to President Jefferson a mammoth cheese, six feet in diameter and nearly two feet thick and weighing 1,230 pounds.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)