Jay, John

Philadelphia, PA — Completed in 1770, this Georgian building was the meeting place of the First Continental Congress in 1774.
Katonah, NY — Jay, who was the first U.S. Chief Justice, moved into the renovated and expanded 24-room farmhouse in 1801, where he lived until his death. The house is restored to the period of Jay's occupancy and includes extensive grounds with a formal garden and related farm structures.
Philadelphia, PA — Completed in 1791 for use by the city, the U.S. Supreme Court shared its space with the mayor until 1800; access is available through park ranger tour.

What ultimately convinced Americans that they must revolt in 1776 was not that they were naturally and inevitably republican, for if that were truly the case evolution, not revolution, would have been the eventual solution. Rather it was the pervasive fear that they were not predestined to be a virtuous and egalitarian people that in the last analysis drove them into revolution in 1776. It was this fear and not their confidence in the peculiarity of their character that made them so readily and so remarkably responsive to Thomas Paine’s warning that the time for independence was at hand and that delay would be disastrous. By 1776 it had become increasingly evident that if they were to remain the kind of people they wanted to be they must become free of Britain.

Gordon S. Wood
The Creation of the American Republic, 1776—1787 (1969)