Knox, Henry

New York, NY — 16 November 1776.
PA — 4 October 1777.
NY — 27 August 1776.
NY — 15 July 1779.
NJ — 26 December 1776 (Second Battle of Trenton, 2 January 1777).
Charleston, MA — The monument that stands in Dorchester Heights is dedicated to the victory of the Continental Army over the British Regulars in 1776.
Boston, MA — 4 March 1776.
Vails Gate, NY — Used by General Knox several times during the war, this 1754 Georgian-style house has been restored and “carefully furnished in period style.”
Thomaston, ME — Built in 1794, Montpelier was constructed as the retirement home of Henry and Lucy Knox, and was in use by the family until 1854; it was razed in 1871. The current Montpelier is a recreation built in 1930 and includes some of Knox’s personal effects.
Trenton, NJ — Built in 1758 for use by British and Irish soldiers during the French and Indian War, in 1776 it housed Hession troops when Washington attacked them in the 1776 Battle of Trenton.

By modern standards there is something unlikeable about John Hancock. His type of patriotism and charity is as obsolete as his brocaded dressing-gowns and jewelled buttons. He was one of those men who curiously go in and out of style. Once they are out they are hard to value. ‘The golden showers of guineas’ that marked his almost royal progress, his big speeches, like ‘burn Boston and make John Hancock a beggar if the public good requires it,’ do not arouse in us the same genuine enthusiasm they did in his contemporaries. Such men as Paul Revere, [Royal Governor Thomas] Hutchinson, Joseph Warren, or Sam Adams never are in style or out. Their personalities exist quite independently from the accident of their birth in the first half of the eighteenth century. This is not quite true of John Hancock.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)