Knox, Henry

New York, NY — 16 November 1776.
PA — 4 October 1777.
NY — 27 August 1776.
NY — 15 July 1779.
NJ — 26 December 1776 (Second Battle of Trenton, 2 January 1777).
Charleston, MA — The monument that stands in Dorchester Heights is dedicated to the victory of the Continental Army over the British Regulars in 1776.
Boston, MA — 4 March 1776.
Vails Gate, NY — Used by General Knox several times during the war, this 1754 Georgian-style house has been restored and “carefully furnished in period style.”
Thomaston, ME — Built in 1794, Montpelier was constructed as the retirement home of Henry and Lucy Knox, and was in use by the family until 1854; it was razed in 1871. The current Montpelier is a recreation built in 1930 and includes some of Knox’s personal effects.
Trenton, NJ — Built in 1758 for use by British and Irish soldiers during the French and Indian War, in 1776 it housed Hession troops when Washington attacked them in the 1776 Battle of Trenton.

C. Vann Woodward has written of Jefferson, It fell to the lot of one Virginian to define America. It was in his private life that Jefferson defined the relationship between blacks and whites in America, acting out in the most specific sense the psychosexual dilemma of the whole nation. Other great men in history have loved unlettered women, among them Rousseau and Goethe, each of whom lived for years with virtually illiterate mistresses and then in the end married them. But Jefferson’s dilemma was peculiarly American. So savage were the penalties of this kind of love in the New World that he could neither admit it nor defend it without fear of social ostracism, and he had to keep up an elaborate pretense that it did not exist. He could not openly, and perhaps even privately admit his paternity to Sally’s children.

Fawn M. Brodie
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974)