Stuart, Gilbert

Newport, RI — Completed in 1739, it was the state house of Rhode Island until 1901.
Saunderston, RI — This restored house, built in 1750, was the birthplace of painter Gilbert Stuart.
Newport, RI — Built 1748—54 and considered one of the ten best colonial homes existing in the U.S.
Washington, DC — Contains historical portraits, including works by John Trumbull, Gilbert Stuart, John Singleton Copley, Mather Brown, and others.
Philadelphia, PA — Founded by Charles Willson Peale, William Rush, and others in 1805, this is the oldest art museum/school in the U.S. Includes works by Charles Willson Peale, William Rush, Benjamin West, Rembrandt Peale, Gilbert Stuart, and Thomas Sully.
Newport, RI — Chartered in 1747 and opened to the public in 1750, it is the oldest circulating library in the U.S.

The press was the mass medium of the eighteenth century, the only way to bring both news and commentary to a broad public audience. The popularity of newspapers soared in Revolutionary America: By the late 1780s, the United States had about ninety-five newspapers, over twice the number at the time of independence. Moreover, the newspapers of 1776 were weeklies, but those of 1787 we often published two or three times a week. There were even a few that appeared daily to satisfy the hungry reading public.

Pauline Maier
Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787—1788 (2010)