Rochambeau, comte de

Yorktown, VA — Includes Cape Henry Memorial and Yorktown Battlefield.
Williamsburg, VA — This brick home was built in 1750 for Wythe, who was a lawyer, teacher of law, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Washington, DC — Dedicated to Lafayette in 1824; at each corner is a statue of one foreign general who served in the war.
Wethersfield, CT — Three separate homes comprising a single museum, including the homes of Silas Deane, a member of the Continental Congress, and Joseph Webb; Washington and Rochambeau met there to lay out strategy.
Yorktown, VA — Site of the battle (1781) that effectively brought the Revolutionary War to an end
Includes Visitor Center and park ranger tours.

No man ever loved Massachusetts with greater intensity than did [Massachusetts Royal Governor] Thomas Hutchinson. He had written her history, fought for her boundaries, re-established her currency, seen to it that her courts and judicial system were kept to a high standard. He had honestly believed in the centralization of power, and that the centre should be in London. The side which won did not, and yet their grandchildren (two of Paul Revere’s among them) were to be dying within a century for the centralization of power in the Federal Government. Hutchinson lost everything by backing the wrong system at the wrong time.... Yet if the other side had won, Thomas Hutchinson would undoubtedly be regarded as one of our great patriots.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)