Franklin, Benjamin

Philadelphia, PA — Founded in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin and John Bartram to promote Useful Knowledge. Philosophical Hall (1789) is now a museum featuring art, scientific instruments, rare books, original manuscripts, natural history specimens, and curiosities.
Philadelphia, PA — A 20-foot marble statue of Franklin greets visitors in the rotunda of The Franklin Institute Science Museum; personal possessions and inventions are on display in Memorial Hall.
Boston, MA — Statue of Franklin and original site of Boston Latin School, founded 1635, and still in existence, but in a different location.
Philadelphia, PA — Founded in 1695, this was the first Anglican Church in Philadelphia; the current wonderfully-preserved structure was built 1727 - 44. Washington, Franklin, Adams, and many other Revolutionary War leaders worshipped here, and many are buried in the nearby Burial Ground.
Philadelphia, PA — Includes Market Street Houses, Franklin’s house — completed in 1765 and razed in 1812 and now only a suggestive steel-frame outline — and an underground museum devoted to Franklin’s life and inventions.
Philadelphia, PA — Site of the Second Continental Congress and of the signing of the Declaration of Independence; access is available through a Park Ranger tour.
Philadelphia, PA — Founded in 1751 by Benjamin Franklin and Dr. Thomas Bond, it was the first hospital in North America; offers welcome center and self-guided walking tour.

As students of Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau are always reminding us, the age of reason was really an age of sentiment. In this too, Washington was a man of his age. When he established the first general decoration in the American Army, the Purple Heart, it was not (as it became in the twentieth century) an award available to all soldiers wounded in the line of duty. Only privates and noncomissioned officers could win the original Badge of Military Merit, a cloth-shaped heart sewn over the man’s actual heart, which allowed him to pass all guards and sentinels which officers are permitted to do. The symbol was not of heart’s blood shed, but of virtue proceeding from the heart. Limiting the award to nonofficers was meant to indicate that great virtue can be shown regardless of rank — that in Washington’s words, the road to glory in a patriot army and a free country is thus open to all.

Garry Wills
Cincinnatus: George Washington & the Enlightenment (1984)