Arnold, Benedict

NY — 10 May 1775.
CT — 6 September 1781.
Quebec City, QC, Canada — 31 December 1775.
NY — 11 October 1776.
SC — 29 May 1780.
NY — 19 September; 17 October 1777.
Groton, CT — The site of the Battle of Groton Heights (1781).
Rome, NY — Built by the British in 1758, it went from American to British to American hands again during the war. The fort is almost completely reconstructed and includes an extensive archaeological collection, a visitor's center, and trails.
Ticonderoga, NY — Built by the French 1755—59 as Fort Carillon, it was taken by the British in 1759 and renamed. During the war the fort went from British to American to British and to American again. Reconstruction began in 1908.
Tarrytown, NY — The Museum has a comprehensive display of research materials, art, and artifacts pertaining to the capture of the British Major John Andre, who was involved in Benedict Arnold’s defection.

Virtually all modern accounts of the Revolution begin in 1763 with the Peace of Paris, the great treaty that concluded the Seven Years’ War. Opening the story there, however, makes the imperial events and conflicts that followed the war — the controversy over the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act crisis — into precursors of the Revolution. No matter how strenuous their other disagreements, most modern historians have looked at the years after 1763 not as contemporary Americans and Britons saw them — as a postwar era vexed by the unanticipated problems in relations between the colonies and metropolis — but as what we in retrospect know those years to have been, a pre-Revolutionary period. By sneaking glances, in effect, at what was coming next, historians robbed their accounts of contingency and suggested, less by design than by inadvertence, that the independence and nationhood of the United States were somehow inevitable.

Fred Anderson
Crucible of War: The Seven Years’ War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754 - 1766 (2000)