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New Hampshire
Place City
American Independence Museum Exeter The museum focuses on the Revolution, colonial life, the Ladd, Gilman, and Folsom families.
Fort Constitution New Castle Originally named Fort William and Mary, colonists captured it 14 December 1774 in one of the first overt acts against England.
Fort Stark Historic Site New Castle Overlooking the Piscataqua River, Little Harbor, and the Atlantic Ocean, Fort Stark was named in honor of General John Stark, commander of New Hampshire forces at the Battle of Bennington (1777).
Governor John Langdon House New Castle Built in 1783 for Major John Langdon — merchant, shipbuilder, representative to Continental Congress, and Governor of New Hampshire.
Moffatt-Ladd House and Garden Portsmouth Georgian Mansion built 1760-63 by merchant John Moffatt; General William Whipple lived there during the war with his wife Katherine Moffatt Whipple.
Strawbery Banke Museum Portsmouth Living history museum dedicated to recreating colonial and early American life.
Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion Portsmouth Built 1720—60, home of New Hampshire's first royal governor, Benning Wentworth.

Because democratic self-government requires a special kind of culture — one that fosters self-reliant selves — the Protestantism of the Founding Fathers also helped the Revolution succeed. Their Protestant worldview placed an intense value on the individual — his conscience, the state of his soul, his understanding of Scripture, his personal relation to God, his salvation. It was an easy step for them to assume that, as each man was endowed by his Creator with an immortal soul immediately related to God, so he was similarly endowed with rights that are not the donation of Law, as Constitution signer William Livingston put it, but prior to all political Institution and resulting in the Nature of Man.

Myron Magnet
The Founders at Home: The Building of America, 1735 - 1817 (2014)