Marquis de Lafayette

by Charles Peale Polk (1767—1822)

Oil on canvas. Stratford Hall, Home of the Lees of Virginia, Stratford, VA.

by Charles Willson Peale (1741—1827)

Oil on canvas; 93" x 64". Annapolis Complex Collection (in the old Senate Chamber at Maryland State House), Annapolis, MD.

by Charles Willson Peale (1741—1827)

Oil on canvas.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Cast when Marquis de Lafayette was 28.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Based on the life mask cast by Houdon in 1785.

by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1741—1828)

Marble. State Artwork Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA.

by William Rush (1756—1833)

Bronze; H: 60 m.; W: 47 m.; D: 26 m. Musée franco-américain du château de Blérancourt, Picardy, France.

by William Rush (1756—1833)

Terra cotta; 21 x 18 3/4 x 11 1/4 in. (53.34 x 47.625 x 28.575 cm). Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA.

by Thomas Sully (1783—1872)

 

by Thomas Sully (1783—1872)

Oil on canvas. Independence National Historical Park, Portrait Collection (Second Bank of the United States), Philadelphia, PA.

The most exciting scientific find of the period was Charles Willson Peale’s exhumation in 1801 near Newburgh, New York, of the bones of the mastodon, or mammoth. Peale displayed his mammoth in his celebrated museum and in 1806 painted a marvelous picture of what was perhaps the first organized exhumation in American history. Peale’s discovery electrified the country and put the word mammoth on everybody’s lips. A Philadelphia baker advertised the sale of mammoth bread. In Washington a mammoth eater ate forty-two eggs in ten minutes. And under the leadership of the Baptist preacher John Leland, the ladies of Cheshire, Massachusetts, late in 1801 sent to President Jefferson a mammoth cheese, six feet in diameter and nearly two feet thick and weighing 1,230 pounds.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)