John Quincy Adams

by John Singleton Copley (1738—1815)

Oil on canvas; 76.52 x 63.5 cm (30 1/8 x 25 in). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on panel; 68 × 55.9 cm (26.77 × 22.01 in) The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on canvas; 76.4 × 63.5 cm (30.08 × 25 in). The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

by Thomas Sully (1783—1872)

Watercolor, black chalk, and graphite on off-white laid paper; 10 3/8 x 6 1/2 in.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on canvas; 241.3 x 151.8 cm (95 x 59 3/4 in). Harvard University Portrait Collection, Cambridge, MA.

Copy of photo by Philip Haas

According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art web site, this image is a copy of a lost daguerreotype of Adams taken by Philip Haas in 1843.

by Studio of Mathew Brady (1822—96)

Daguerreotype.

by Edward Dalton Marchant (1806—87)

 

by George Peter Alexander Healy (1813—94)

Oil on canvas; Height: 1,574.8 mm (62 in). Width: 1,193.8 mm (47 in). The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

[Lord Frederick] North defended his role in the war for America to his death. He insisted that it did not originate in a despotic wish to tyrannise America, but from the desire of maintaining constitutional authority of Parliament over the colonies. He admitted that the war with American had been unfortunate but not unjust, adding that if he had been forced to mount the scaffold in consequence of the part that I have performed in its prosecution, I shall continue to maintain that it was founded in right and dictated by necessity.

Andrew Jackson O’Shaughnessy
The Men Who Lost America: British Leadership, the American Revolution, and the Fate of the Empire (2013)