John Quincy Adams

by John Singleton Copley (1738—1815)

Oil on canvas; 76.52 x 63.5 cm (30 1/8 x 25 in). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on panel; 68 × 55.9 cm (26.77 × 22.01 in) The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on canvas; 76.4 × 63.5 cm (30.08 × 25 in). The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

by Thomas Sully (1783—1872)

Watercolor, black chalk, and graphite on off-white laid paper; 10 3/8 x 6 1/2 in.

by Gilbert Stuart (1755—1828)

Oil on canvas; 241.3 x 151.8 cm (95 x 59 3/4 in). Harvard University Portrait Collection, Cambridge, MA.

Copy of photo by Philip Haas

According to the Metropolitan Museum of Art web site, this image is a copy of a lost daguerreotype of Adams taken by Philip Haas in 1843.

by Studio of Mathew Brady (1822—96)

Daguerreotype.

by Edward Dalton Marchant (1806—87)

 

by George Peter Alexander Healy (1813—94)

Oil on canvas; Height: 1,574.8 mm (62 in). Width: 1,193.8 mm (47 in). The White House Collection, Washington, DC.

The Farm Book, plus the elaborate chronologies made by Jefferson scholars which document almost every day of his life, demonstrate that contrary to what Martha [Jefferson] Randolph told her sons, Jefferson was not only not distant from Sally Hemings but in the same house nine months before the births of each of her seven children, and that she conceived no children when he was not there.

Fawn M. Brodie
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History (1974)