General

Continental Army general — one of Washington’s best; 1726—1783.
Talented Continental Army general who defected to the British; 1741—1801.
British playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga; 1722—92.
Governor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83; 1724—1808.
French general, liaison between Rochambeau and Washington; 1734—88.
Soldier, politician, New York governor, vice president under Jefferson and Madison; 1739—1812.
British general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82; 1730—95.
British general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown; 1738—1805.
German general; died at the Battle of Fort Mercer.
British general, Royal Governor of Massachusetts, ordered troops to Concord; 1719/20—87.

Visitors to Monticello often wonder at its practical accessories. Jefferson labored a month to save a minute. His home was impractical from the start — by reason of its very site (on a mountain), by the height given the first version of the building (later disguised in a way that left useless spaces in and around its dome), by the perpetual course of its dismantling and reassembly. To make the house more convenient, he made his daughter and her children live for years in a chaos of artistic second thoughts, sometimes sheltered only by canvas as the roof rose, fell, and assumed new shapes in his mind.

Garry Wills
Inventing America: Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence (1978)