Britain

British officer, hung as a spy for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason.
British playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga; 1722—92.
Anglo-Irish statesman, orator, author, and political philosopher; 1729—97.
Governor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83; 1724—1808.
British general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82; 1730—95.
British general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown; 1738—1805.
King of Great Britain in 1760, at age 22, until 1820; b. 1738.
British lord, American Secretary, 1775—82; 1716—85.
American Secretary, 1768—72; 1718—93.
British admiral, brother of William Howe; 1726—99.

But the peculiar character of [Aaron] Burr’s correspondence goes beyond his preoccupation with haste and secrecy. Burr never developed any ideas about constitutionalism or governmental policy in the way the other Revolutionary statesmen did, because, in truth, he was not much concerned about such matters. If he had any idea about the new federal Constitution of 1787, he left no record of it.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)