Britain

British officer, hung as a spy for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason.
British playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga; 1722—92.
Anglo-Irish statesman, orator, author, and political philosopher; 1729—97.
Governor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83; 1724—1808.
British general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82; 1730—95.
British general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown; 1738—1805.
King of Great Britain in 1760, at age 22, until 1820; b. 1738.
British lord, American Secretary, 1775—82; 1716—85.
American Secretary, 1768—72; 1718—93.
British admiral, brother of William Howe; 1726—99.

In a land where horsemanship was often men’s touchiest point of pride, Jefferson had to admit he never saw Washington’s like for grace and control in the saddle. A froniter runner and Indian wrestler — his friend George Mercer described his frame as padded with well-developed muscles — Washington had by 1774 refined mere energy down to a grace of least movement, the higher athleticism of the dance. And he danced well.

Garry Wills
Inventing America: Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence (1978)