Britain

British officer, hung as a spy for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason.
British playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga; 1722—92.
Anglo-Irish statesman, orator, author, and political philosopher; 1729—97.
Governor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782 - 83; 1724—1808.
British general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82; 1730—95.
British general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown; 1738—1805.
King of Great Britain in 1760, at age 22, until 1820; b. 1738.
British lord, American Secretary, 1775—82; 1716—85.
American Secretary, 1768—72; 1718—93.
British admiral, brother of William Howe; 1726—99.

John Adams was inaugurated as second president on March 4, 1797. Washington had preceded him to the hall and sat on the dais with Jefferson the Vice-President-elect, as Adams spoke. When the new President finished and left, Washington motioned to Jefferson to go next. The two Virginians had known each other since 1769, when Washington had been thirty-seven years old and Jefferson only twenty-six. From long habit and lingering respect, Jefferson now held back. But Washington gestured again, in a manner not to be ignored. The younger man was now Vice-President and must go first.

Richard Brookhiser
Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington (1996)