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The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777
by Rick Atkinson
Published: 2019
The Indian World of George Washington
by Colin G. Calloway
Published: 2018
The Price of Greatness: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and the Creation of American Oligarchy
by Jay Cost
Published: 2018
Apostles of Revolution: Jefferson, Paine, Monroe, and the Struggle Against the Old Order in America and Europe
by John Ferling
Published: 2018
In the Hurricane's Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown
by Nathaniel Philbrick
Published: 2018
Young Washington: How Wilderness and War Forged America’s Founding Father
by Peter Stark
Published: 2018
John Marshall
John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court
by Richard Brookhiser
Published: 2018
Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times
by Joel Richard Paul
Published: 2018
Benjamin Rush
Rush: Revolutionary, Madness & the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father
by Stephen Fried
Published: 2018
Dr. Benjamin Rush: The Founding Father Who Healed a Wounded Nation
by Harlow Giles Unger
Published: 2018

By modern standards there is something unlikeable about John Hancock. His type of patriotism and charity is as obsolete as his brocaded dressing-gowns and jewelled buttons. He was one of those men who curiously go in and out of style. Once they are out they are hard to value. ‘The golden showers of guineas’ that marked his almost royal progress, his big speeches, like ‘burn Boston and make John Hancock a beggar if the public good requires it,’ do not arouse in us the same genuine enthusiasm they did in his contemporaries. Such men as Paul Revere, [Royal Governor Thomas] Hutchinson, Joseph Warren, or Sam Adams never are in style or out. Their personalities exist quite independently from the accident of their birth in the first half of the eighteenth century. This is not quite true of John Hancock.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)