Portraits of British

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Home Government

Military

  • John AndréBritish officer, hung for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason
  • John BurgoyneBritish playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga
  • Henry ClintonBritish general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82
  • Charles CornwallisBritish general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown
  • Richard HoweBritish admiral, brother of William Howe
  • William HoweCommander-in-chief of British forces, 1775—78
  • Banastre TarletonBritish officer of the cavalry, notorious for his exploits in the South

Military Governors

  • Guy CarletonGovernor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782—83
  • Thomas GageBritish general, Royal Governor of MA, ordered troops to Concord

The press was the mass medium of the eighteenth century, the only way to bring both news and commentary to a broad public audience. The popularity of newspapers soared in Revolutionary America: By the late 1780s, the United States had about ninety-five newspapers, over twice the number at the time of independence. Moreover, the newspapers of 1776 were weeklies, but those of 1787 we often published two or three times a week. There were even a few that appeared daily to satisfy the hungry reading public.

Pauline Maier
Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787—1788 (2010)