Portraits of British

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Home Government

Military

  • John AndréBritish officer, hung for his involvement in Benedict Arnold’s treason
  • John BurgoyneBritish playwright, politician; general who lost the Battles of Saratoga
  • Henry ClintonBritish general; commander-in-chief, 1778—82
  • Charles CornwallisBritish general, surrendered with troops at Yorktown
  • Richard HoweBritish admiral, brother of William Howe
  • William HoweCommander-in-chief of British forces, 1775—78
  • Banastre TarletonBritish officer of the cavalry, notorious for his exploits in the South

Military Governors

  • Guy CarletonGovernor of Quebec; British commander-in-chief, 1782—83
  • Thomas GageBritish general, Royal Governor of MA, ordered troops to Concord

Washington’s courage thrilled his men. But he was not an enlisted man’s general. He did not interact personally with them, and would not let his officers do so either. Officers under his command who supped or slept in enlisted men’s headquarters were routinely punished. To Washington’s mind, discipline and hierarchy were central to maintaining unit cohesion and integrity. No warm, outgoing person, notes one historian, Washington bound men to him by his own sense of justice and dedication. Yet how his troops viewed him, and in what ways their opinions may have changed over time, is uncertain. Although nineteenth-century history books and old soldiers’ memoirs resonate with references to the commander-in-chief’s inspirational presence, diaries and other accounts written in wartime rarely mention him.

Edward G. Lengel
General George Washington: A Military Life (2005)