Battle Maps

battles  |  campaigns  |  maps

Map Battle End Date Sort descending

Battle of Lexington / Concord

19-Apr-1775

Battle of Bunker Hill

17-Jun-1775

Battle of Quebec

31-Dec-1775

Fortification of Dorchester Heights

04-Mar-1776

Battle of Long Island

27-Aug-1776

Battle of Harlem Heights

16-Sep-1776

Battle of Valcour Island

11-Oct-1776

Battle of Trenton

26-Dec-1776

Battle of Princeton

03-Jan-1777

Siege of Fort Ticonderoga

06-Jul-1777

Battle of Brandywine

11-Sep-1777

Battle of Germantown

04-Oct-1777

Battle of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton

06-Oct-1777

Battles of Saratoga

07-Oct-1777

Battle of Monmouth

28-Jun-1778

Battle of Stony Point

15-Jul-1779

Siege of Charleston

12-May-1780

Battle of Camden

16-Aug-1780

Battle of Cowpens

17-Jan-1781

Battle of Guilford Courthouse

15-Mar-1781

Battle of Chesapeake Capes

05-Sep-1781

Battle of Eutaw Springs

08-Sep-1781

Siege of Yorktown

19-Oct-1781

In 1789 the South and especially Virginia had been the impelling force in creating the nation. By 1815 the South and slaveholders still seemed to be in control of the national government. President Madison was a slaveholder. So too were Speaker of the House, Henry Clay, James Monroe, the secretary of state, and George W. Campbell, the secretary of the treasury. All Republican leaders of the House were slaveholders. In 1815 the United States had four missions in Europe: two of them were held by slaveholders. The chief justice of the United States was a slaveholder, as were a majority of the other members of the Court. Since 1789 three of the four presidents, two of the five vice-presidents, fourteen of the twenty-six presidents pro tempore the Senate, and five of the ten Speakers of the House had been slaveholders.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)