American Campaigns

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Invasion of Canada
Battle End Date Sort descending Commander for Americans | British
Battle of Fort Ticonderoga 10-May-1775 Ethan Allen | William Delaplace
Battle of Quebec 31-Dec-1775 Richard Montgomery | Guy Carleton
Battle of Valcour Island 11-Oct-1776 Benedict Arnold | Guy Carleton
Rhode Island Campaign
Battle End Date Sort descending Commander for Americans | British
Battle of Rhode Island 29-Aug-1778 John Sullivan | Robert Pigot
Yorktown Campaign
Battle End Date Sort descending Commander for Americans | British
Battle of Chesapeake Capes 05-Sep-1781 comte de Grasse | Thomas Graves
Battle of Groton Heights 06-Sep-1781 William Ledyard | Benedict Arnold
Siege of Yorktown 19-Oct-1781 George Washington | Charles Cornwallis

By 1789 many of the Federalists, particularly Hamilton, had no confidence whatsoever left in the virtue or the natural sociability of the American people as adhesive forces: to rely on such wild schemes and visionary principles, as radicals like Jefferson and Paine did, to tie the United States together, the Federalists said, was to rely on nothing. Hence Hamilton and the other Federalist leaders had to find things other than republican virtue and natural sociability to make the American people a single nation.

Tying people together, creating social cohesiveness, making a single nation out of disparate sections and communities without relying on idealistic republican adhesives — this was the preoccupation of the Federalists, and it explains much of what they did — from Washington’s proposals for building canals to Hamilton’s financial program.

Gordon S. Wood
The Idea of America: Reflections on the Birth of the United States (2011)