Places to Visit

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Vermont
Place City Sort descending
Bennington Battle Monument Bennington An obelisk marks the site where military supplies were stored and commemorates the battle that took place two miles away in New York.
Bennington Museum Bennington Memorializes the Battle of Bennington (1777); includes local and military artifacts and the “Bennington Flag.”
Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site Hubbardton The visitor center has a museum that includes artifacts and a diorama of the battle.
Mount Independence State Historic Site Orwell Remnants of a fort and the most important Revolutionary War site in Vermont. Originally connected to Fort Ticonderoga by a floating bridge.
Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Vergennes Dedicated to preserving the maritime history of Lake Champlain, it includes a replica of a gunboat used by Benedict Arnold.
Old Constitution House Windsor Delegates from the independent state of Vermont met here to write a constitution, making it a republic.

In 1775 the British government was not the limited monarchy we know today. The King was in charge of the executive branch of the government and his duties and powers corresponded, roughly, to those the President now handles in the United States. ... Political parties as we understand them today had yet to be born. England was split into four or five factions, some revolving around a noble Lord such as Marquis of Rockingham, some around a class (the country squires) and roughly on-third of Parliament around the King who, through his executive power, had innumerable jobs, from cabinet post to lucrative sinecures, to dispense among those who supported him.

Thomas Fleming
Now We Are Enemies: The Story of Bunker Hill (1960; reissued 2010)