James Madison’s Montpelier

Orange
VA

Madison’s restored home in Virginia

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QUICK FACTS
  • When building completed (c. 1764), Montpelier became one of the largest brick homes in Orange county.
  • Montpelier is expanded twice by Madison. The first time (1797 - 1800), it allows James and Dolley Todd Madison (married 1794), to have a virtually separate house from that of the parents. A 30-foot extension (front-left) provides private space and a Tuscan portico placed in the center creates a unified exterior.
  • During Madison’s presidency Montpelier is expanded again (1809 - 12) to include one story wings at each end of the house, plus the addition of a large drawing room.
  • Dolley Madison sells the estate (1844) and it goes through successive owners until it is purchased by William and Annie Rogers duPont (1901).
  • The duPonts’ daughter, Marion, eventually doubles the size of the mansion; she also bequeaths it to the National Trust for Historic Preservation at her death (1983).
  • Restoration of Montpelier to its c. 1820 appearance begins 2003 and is formally completed on Constitution Day, 17-Sep-2008.
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Built c. 1764 by his father, Montpelier was the lifelong home of James Madison. Fully restored in 2008, the estate currently encompasses nearly 2,700 acres (though during Madison’s time there were some 4,000 acres, as well as about 100 slaves) with breathtaking views of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

While the architecture has been restored to its c. 1820 appearance, work on finishing and furnishing the interior is in progress. After her husband’s death in 1836, Dolley Madison sold or gave away the contents of the mansion. Now work is underway to understand the decorations of each room and to try to reinstall original or period furniture.

A 45-minute guided tour takes visitors through the first and the second floors of the mansion, including the presidential-era library on the first floor, and the room on the second floor that contained the Old Library, where Madison spent months preparing for the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

The estate includes Mr. Madison’s Temple, formal gardens, trails, and the Madison Family Cemetery, where James and Dolley Madison are buried. A Visitors Center includes an introductory movie, exhibits, a museum, and the Archaeology Lab.

Associated People

By modern standards there is something unlikeable about John Hancock. His type of patriotism and charity is as obsolete as his brocaded dressing-gowns and jewelled buttons. He was one of those men who curiously go in and out of style. Once they are out they are hard to value. ‘The golden showers of guineas’ that marked his almost royal progress, his big speeches, like ‘burn Boston and make John Hancock a beggar if the public good requires it,’ do not arouse in us the same genuine enthusiasm they did in his contemporaries. Such men as Paul Revere, [Royal Governor Thomas] Hutchinson, Joseph Warren, or Sam Adams never are in style or out. Their personalities exist quite independently from the accident of their birth in the first half of the eighteenth century. This is not quite true of John Hancock.

Esther Forbes
Paul Revere & The World He Lived In (1942)