Hamilton Grange National Memorial

New York
NY

Hamilton Grange in upper Manhattan

QUICK FACTS
  • Hamilton only lived in the home for two summers; he was fatally wounded by Aaron Burr in a dual 11-Jul-1804.
  • This is the third location for the house. It was moved in 1889 (by four blocks) and then again to its present location (2 blocks) in 2008.
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Completed in 1802, Alexander Hamilton commissioned this Federal style country home on 32-acres in upper Manhattan for use during the summer by his family. He was deeply involved with the architect, John McComb, Jr., to ensure the design met his specifications. Hamilton named it The Grange after his family’s ancestral home in Scotland.

Moved to a new location in 2008, the house sits on a portion of St. Nicholas Park in upper Manhattan, which was part of the original estate. It re-opened 17 September 2011 after $14.5 million in renovations by the National Park Service.

Associated People

[George] Mason’s obvious legacy is in his contribution to America’s founding documents: the Declaration of Independence through the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the Constitution through his role at the Philadelphia Convention, and the Bill of Rights through his dogged opposition to a Constitution without one. Mason may have taken a circumscribed view of the rights he advocated — limiting the right of representation to white men or restricting freedom of the press to a ban on prior restraint — but he put words on paper that could be given more expansive meanings by later generations.

Jeff Broadwater
George Mason: Forgotten Founder (2006)