Places to Visit

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Connecticut
Place City Sort descending
Nathan Hale Homestead Coventry Built in 1776 and restored.
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park Groton The site of the Battle of Groton Heights (1781).
Yale University Art Gallery New Haven Home to one of the finest collections of early American art anywhere, it was founded in 1832 when John Trumbull gave more than one hundred of his portraits and historical paintings to Yale. Renovation and expansion completed in 2012.
Shaw Mansion New London Built by Nathaniel Shaw; used by both Washington and Lafayette during the war.
Nathan Hale Schoolhouse New London The schoolhouse where Nathan Hale taught.
General William Hart House Old Saybrook Built in 1767 and restored to its original condition, it is Old Saybrook Historical Society’s museum and headquarters.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum Wethersfield Three separate homes comprising a single museum, including the homes of Silas Deane, a member of the Continental Congress, and Joseph Webb; Washington and Rochambeau met there to lay out strategy.

In 1775 the British government was not the limited monarchy we know today. The King was in charge of the executive branch of the government and his duties and powers corresponded, roughly, to those the President now handles in the United States. ... Political parties as we understand them today had yet to be born. England was split into four or five factions, some revolving around a noble Lord such as Marquis of Rockingham, some around a class (the country squires) and roughly on-third of Parliament around the King who, through his executive power, had innumerable jobs, from cabinet post to lucrative sinecures, to dispense among those who supported him.

Thomas Fleming
Now We Are Enemies: The Story of Bunker Hill (1960; reissued 2010)