Places to Visit

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Connecticut
Place Sort descending City
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park Groton The site of the Battle of Groton Heights (1781).
General William Hart House Old Saybrook Built in 1767 and restored to its original condition, it is Old Saybrook Historical Society’s museum and headquarters.
Nathan Hale Homestead Coventry Built in 1776 and restored.
Nathan Hale Schoolhouse New London The schoolhouse where Nathan Hale taught.
Shaw Mansion New London Built by Nathaniel Shaw; used by both Washington and Lafayette during the war.
Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum Wethersfield Three separate homes comprising a single museum, including the homes of Silas Deane, a member of the Continental Congress, and Joseph Webb; Washington and Rochambeau met there to lay out strategy.
Yale University Art Gallery New Haven Home to one of the finest collections of early American art anywhere, it was founded in 1832 when John Trumbull gave more than one hundred of his portraits and historical paintings to Yale. Renovation and expansion completed in 2012.

[Thomas Jefferson] was undoubtedly complicated. He mingled the loftiest visions with astute backroom politicking. He spared himself nothing and was a compulsive shopper, yet he extolled the simple yeoman farmer who was free from the lures of the marketplace. He hated obsessive money-making, the proliferating banks, and the liberal capitalistic world that emerged in the Northern states in the early nineteenth century, but no one in American did more to bring that about. Although he kept the most tidy and meticulous accounts of his daily transactions, he never added up his profits and losses. He thought public debts were the curse of a healthy state, yet his private debts kept mounting as he borrowed and borrowed again to meet his rising expenditures. He was a sophisticated man of the world who loved no place better than his remote mountaintop home in Virginia. This slaveholding aristocrat ended up becoming the most important apostle for liberty and democracy in American history.

Gordon S. Wood
Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815 (2009)