Howe, William

PA — 11 September 1777.
Charlestown, MA — 17 June 1775.
New York, NY — 16 November 1776.
PA — 4 October 1777.
NY — 27 August 1776.
NY — 28 October 1776.
Charlestown, MA — With groundbreaking fifty years after the event of 17 June 1775, an obelisk commemorates the Battle of Bunker Hill and the fallen militia General Dr. Joseph Warren. A statue of Colonel William Prescott, one of the battle leaders, stands in front.
Philadelphia (Germantown), PA — Completed in 1772, British General Sir William Howe occupied the house after the Battle of Germantown in 1777; President Washington resided there in 1793 and 1794; includes period pieces and interactive exhibits.
Fort Washington, PA — Site of the temporary fort and encampment for the Continental Army in late 1777; offers picnicking, fishing, biking, and 3.5 miles of trails.
Boston, MA — 4 March 1776.

The press was the mass medium of the eighteenth century, the only way to bring both news and commentary to a broad public audience. The popularity of newspapers soared in Revolutionary America: By the late 1780s, the United States had about ninety-five newspapers, over twice the number at the time of independence. Moreover, the newspapers of 1776 were weeklies, but those of 1787 we often published two or three times a week. There were even a few that appeared daily to satisfy the hungry reading public.

Pauline Maier
Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787—1788 (2010)