Sullivan, John

PA — 11 September 1777.
 
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PA — 4 October 1777.
 
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Princeton, NJ — 3 January 1777.
 
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Aquidneck Island, RI — 29 August 1778.
 
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NJ — 26 December 1776 (Second Battle of Trenton, 2 January 1777).
 
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Portsmouth, RI — The earthwork redoubt is still discernible, it was a key position during the Battle of Rhode Island (1778), and provides a panoramic view of Mt. Hope Bay.
 
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Trenton, NJ — Built in 1758 for use by British and Irish soldiers during the French and Indian War, in 1776 it housed Hession troops when Washington attacked them in the 1776 Battle of Trenton.
 
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Princeton, NJ — Dedicated in 1922, the monument commemorates the battle won by Washington on 3 January 1777.
 
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Princeton, NJ — This National Historic Landmark covers 85 acres; includes the Clarke House Museum and adjacent trails.
 
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Trenton, NJ — A 155-foot granite column that commemorates the 1776 Battle of Trenton; accessible by means of an elevator with good views of the capital of New Jersey.
 
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What ultimately convinced Americans that they must revolt in 1776 was not that they were naturally and inevitably republican, for if that were truly the case evolution, not revolution, would have been the eventual solution. Rather it was the pervasive fear that they were not predestined to be a virtuous and egalitarian people that in the last analysis drove them into revolution in 1776. It was this fear and not their confidence in the peculiarity of their character that made them so readily and so remarkably responsive to Thomas Paine’s warning that the time for independence was at hand and that delay would be disastrous. By 1776 it had become increasingly evident that if they were to remain the kind of people they wanted to be they must become free of Britain.

Gordon S. Wood
The Creation of the American Republic, 1776—1787 (1969)