Charm and Reenactment at Fort Ticonderga

  • It’s not just the Civil War that has passionate participants performing in famous battle reenactments, there are localized instances of reenactments from the American Revolution as well. Probably the best known is the recreation played out every year on Lexington Battle Green (starting at 5:30 am) as part of Patriots’ Day, a Massachusetts state holiday. To better understand the attraction of these reenactments for the participants, read this charming piece — Where the Past is Never Left Behind — about how one mother was finally seduced into enjoying with her family the setting, the view, and eventually the history and its fake battles at Fort Ticonderoga on Lake George, New York (The New York Times, 12-Sep-2013).
JDN | 23-Aug-2013

Racial prejudice worked to perpetuate American slavery, even if it was not essential to sustain the institution. Slavery, serfdom, and peonage had existed elsewhere without racial connotations. Indeed, bondage had been so historically ubiquitous one might well ask why, by the 1760’s, it had come to trouble so many white Americans so much. The answer lies in part — and this part help explain why people like Mason did not act more aggressively on their concerns — in the reservations many whites felt about living alongside members of a supposedly inferior race, whether slave or free. The problem was inherent in American slavery, and emancipation, by undermining white control, would only make it worse.

Jeff Broadwater
George Mason: Forgotten Founder (2006)